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Author Mock, T. url  openurl
  Title In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Hydrobiologia Abbreviated Journal Hydrobiologia  
  Volume (down) 470 Issue 1-3 Pages 127-132  
  Keywords Sea ice; Marine ecosystems; Primary production; Algae; Epontic organisms; Light effects; Epontic environment; Temperature effects; Brines; Salinity effects; Carbon fixation; Antarctica; Weddell Sea; Psw; Ice; In-situ; 14c; Methods  
  Abstract An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The light transmission was improved by the construction of a cylindrical frame instead of using a transparent acrylic-glass barrel. The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice, which is an important component in the sea ice ecosystem of the Antarctic Ocean. The rates of carbon assimilation of the interior algal assemblage (top to 5 cm from bottom) was 0.25 mg C m?² d?¹ whereas the bottom algal community (lowest 5 cm) attained only 0.02 mg C m?² d?¹. Chl a specific production rates (PChl) for bottom algae (0.020 – 0.056 µg C µg chl a?¹ h?¹) revealed strong light limitation, whereas the interior algae (PChl = 0.7 – 1.2 µg C µg chl a?¹ h?¹) were probably more limited by low temperatures (< -5 degree C) and high brine salinities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers Place of Publication Dordrecht Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Freshwater; Brackish; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Mock2002Hydrobiologia Serial 802  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clough, J.F.; Zirkle, L.G.; Schmitt, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of SIGN in the development of a global orthopaedic trauma database Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Abbreviated Journal Clin Orthop Relat Res  
  Volume (down) 468 Issue 10 Pages 2592-2597  
  Keywords *Bone Nails; Cooperative Behavior; *Databases as Topic; *Developing Countries; Fracture Fixation/*instrumentation; Fractures, Bone/epidemiology/radiography/*surgery; Humans; International Cooperation; *Internationality; Internet; *Organizations, Nonprofit; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The global burden of injury is receiving recognition as a major public health problem but inadequate information delays many proposed solutions. Many attempts to collect reliable data on orthopaedic trauma have been unsuccessful. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) database is one of the largest collections of fracture cases from lower and middle income countries. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We describe the information in the SIGN database then address two questions: In the context of the design and implementation of a global trauma database, what lessons does the SIGN database teach? Does the SIGN program have a role in the evolution of a wider global system? METHODS: The SIGN database is Internet based. After treating a patient with a SIGN nail surgeons enter radiographs and details of the case. RESULTS: Over 26000 cases are in the SIGN database. The database has been used as a source of cases for followup studies. Analysis shows the data are of sufficient quality to allow studies of fracture patterns but not for outcome studies or bone measurement. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: A global database with more comprehensive coverage of injuries, causes, treatment modalities and outcomes is needed. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: The SIGN database itself will not become a global trauma database (GTD) but the personnel of the SIGN program have much to offer in the design and adoption of a GTD. Studies of suitable methods of data collection and the incentive to use them are required.  
  Address Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, 198 Waddington Drive, Kamloops, Vancouver, BC, V2E 1M4, Canada. mylesclough@shaw.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0009-921X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20593255 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 10109  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clough, J.F.; Zirkle, L.G.; Schmitt, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of SIGN in the development of a global orthopaedic trauma database Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Abbreviated Journal Clin Orthop Relat Res  
  Volume (down) 468 Issue 10 Pages 2592-2597  
  Keywords *Bone Nails; Cooperative Behavior; *Databases as Topic; *Developing Countries; Fracture Fixation/*instrumentation; Fractures, Bone/epidemiology/radiography/*surgery; Humans; International Cooperation; *Internationality; Internet; *Organizations, Nonprofit; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The global burden of injury is receiving recognition as a major public health problem but inadequate information delays many proposed solutions. Many attempts to collect reliable data on orthopaedic trauma have been unsuccessful. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) database is one of the largest collections of fracture cases from lower and middle income countries. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We describe the information in the SIGN database then address two questions: In the context of the design and implementation of a global trauma database, what lessons does the SIGN database teach? Does the SIGN program have a role in the evolution of a wider global system? METHODS: The SIGN database is Internet based. After treating a patient with a SIGN nail surgeons enter radiographs and details of the case. RESULTS: Over 26000 cases are in the SIGN database. The database has been used as a source of cases for followup studies. Analysis shows the data are of sufficient quality to allow studies of fracture patterns but not for outcome studies or bone measurement. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: A global database with more comprehensive coverage of injuries, causes, treatment modalities and outcomes is needed. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: The SIGN database itself will not become a global trauma database (GTD) but the personnel of the SIGN program have much to offer in the design and adoption of a GTD. Studies of suitable methods of data collection and the incentive to use them are required.  
  Address Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, 198 Waddington Drive, Kamloops, Vancouver, BC, V2E 1M4, Canada. mylesclough@shaw.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0009-921X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20593255 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 10783  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Muotri, A.R.; Marchetto, M.C.N.; Coufal, N.G.; Oefner, R.; Yeo, G.; Nakashima, K.; Gage, F.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title L1 retrotransposition in neurons is modulated by MeCP2 Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume (down) 468 Issue 7322 Pages 443-446  
  Keywords 5' Untranslated Regions/genetics; Animals; Brain/cytology/metabolism; DNA Methylation; Gene Silencing; Humans; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism; Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements/*genetics; Male; Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism; Methylation; Mice; Neuroepithelial Cells/metabolism; Neurons/*metabolism; Organ Specificity; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics; Rats; Recombination, Genetic/*genetics; Rett Syndrome/genetics/pathology; Transcription, Genetic/genetics  
  Abstract Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1s) are abundant retrotransposons that comprise approximately 20% of mammalian genomes. Active L1 retrotransposons can impact the genome in a variety of ways, creating insertions, deletions, new splice sites or gene expression fine-tuning. We have shown previously that L1 retrotransposons are capable of mobilization in neuronal progenitor cells from rodents and humans and evidence of massive L1 insertions was observed in adult brain tissues but not in other somatic tissues. In addition, L1 mobility in the adult hippocampus can be influenced by the environment. The neuronal specificity of somatic L1 retrotransposition in neural progenitors is partially due to the transition of a Sox2/HDAC1 repressor complex to a Wnt-mediated T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcriptional activator. The transcriptional switch accompanies chromatin remodelling during neuronal differentiation, allowing a transient stimulation of L1 transcription. The activity of L1 retrotransposons during brain development can have an impact on gene expression and neuronal function, thereby increasing brain-specific genetic mosaicism. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate L1 expression should provide new insights into the role of L1 retrotransposition during brain development. Here we show that L1 neuronal transcription and retrotransposition in rodents are increased in the absence of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2), a protein involved in global DNA methylation and human neurodevelopmental diseases. Using neuronal progenitor cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and human tissues, we revealed that patients with Rett syndrome (RTT), carrying MeCP2 mutations, have increased susceptibility for L1 retrotransposition. Our data demonstrate that L1 retrotransposition can be controlled in a tissue-specific manner and that disease-related genetic mutations can influence the frequency of neuronal L1 retrotransposition. Our findings add a new level of complexity to the molecular events that can lead to neurological disorders.  
  Address University of California San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics/Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0695, USA. muotri@ucsd.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21085180; PMCID:PMC3059197 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 16995  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Studer, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neuroscience: Excessive mobility interrupted Type News
  Year 2010 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume (down) 468 Issue 7322 Pages 383-384  
  Keywords Animals; Brain/cytology/metabolism; DNA Methylation; Gene Silencing; Humans; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism; Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements/*genetics; Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Neuroepithelial Cells/metabolism; Neurons/*metabolism; Recombination, Genetic/*genetics; Rett Syndrome/genetics/pathology; Transcription, Genetic/genetics  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21085168 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 16996  
Permanent link to this record
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