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Author Author,; 2, A.; SecAuthor,; Tert,; Subramanian, S.; Trans, url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Geophysical Research Letters Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1974 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages Pages  
  Keywords Geophysics Periodicals; Planets Periodicals; Lunar geology Periodicals  
  Abstract Ab  
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  Publisher American Geophysical Union Place of Publication American Geophysical Union, 1909 K St. N.W., Washington, DC 20006 Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Alt  
  Series Volume Vol Series Issue Num Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0094-8276 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Description based on: vol. 13, no. 4, Apr. 1986.Semimonthly, 1992-Monthly, -1991 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Lab Serial 4114  
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Author Ullsperger, M.; Bylsma, L.M.; Botvinick, M.M. url  openurl
  Title The conflict adaptation effect: It's not just priming Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 467-472  
  Keywords conflict adaptation effect; priming; cognitive adaptation; response conflict monitoring; repetition-priming; information processing; Adjustment; Cognitive Processes; Conflict; Learning; Interference (Learning); Responses; Sequential Learning  
  Abstract Analyses of trial sequences in flanker tasks have revealed cognitive adaptation, reflected in a reduced interference effect following incompatible trials (Gratton, Coles, & Donchin, 1992). These effects have been explained on the basis of the response conflict monitoring model of Botvinick, Braver, Barch, Carter, and Cohen (2001), who proposed that preceding response conflict triggers stronger top-down control, leading to performance improvements on subsequent trials of similar context. A recent study (Mayr, Awh, & Laurey, 2003) has challenged this account, suggesting that the behavioral adaptations are confined to trial sequences of exact trial repetitions and can therefore be explained by repetition priming. Here, we present two experiments in which the sequential dependency effect was present even on trial sequences that did not involve stimulus repeats. We discuss the data with respect to the conflict-monitoring and repetition-priming accounts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)  
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  Publisher Psychonomic Society Place of Publication Ullsperger, Markus, Max Planck Institute Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Stephanstr. 1A, Leipzig Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 1530-70261531-135XAccession Number: 2006-01276-008. First Author & Affiliation: Ullsperger, Markus; Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany. Release Date: 20060130. Publication Type: Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal. Media Covered: Print. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Original Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor(s): Adjustment; Cognitive Processes; Conflict; Learning; Priming. Minor Descriptor(s): Interference (Learning); Responses; Sequential Learning. Classification: Human Experimental Psychology (2300). Population: Human (10)Male (30)Female (40). Location: Germany; US. Age Group:Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300); Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs) (320); Thirties (30-39 yrs) (340); . References Available: Y. Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Ullsperger2005 Serial 4573  
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Author Aron, A.R.; Schlaghecken, F.; Fletcher, P.C.; Bullmore, E.T.; Eimer, M.; Barker, R.; Sahakian, B.J.; Robbins, T.W. url  openurl
  Title Inhibition of subliminally primed responses is mediated by the caudate and thalamus: Evidence from functional MRI and Huntington's disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Brain: A Journal of Neurology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 126 Issue 3 Pages 713-723  
  Keywords subliminally primed responses; caudate; thalamus; Huntington's disease; corticostriatal-pallidal-thalamic pathway; Caudate Nucleus; Huntingtons Disease; Neuropsychology; Priming  
  Abstract The present study investigated the possibility that inhibitory control processes are mediated by a corticostriatal-pallidal-thalamic pathway by using a masked prime task with Huntington's disease patients and with healthy volunteers in a functional MRI (fMRI) study. In the masked prime task, clearly visible left- or right-pointing target arrows are preceded by briefly presented and subsequently masked prime arrows. Participants respond quickly with a left or right key-press to each target. Trials are either compatible or incompatible. Prior behavioural and electrophysiological results show that automatic inhibition of the initially primed response tendency is reflected in a 'negative compatibility effect', and is shown to consist of three distinct processes occurring within 300 ms. Experiment 1 tested the hypothesis that lesions of the striatum would interrupt automatic inhibitory control by studying early-stage Huntington's disease patients. Findings supported the hypothesis: there was a bimodal distribution for patients, with one-third showing disinhibition, manifested as an absent negative compatibility effect, and two-thirds showing excessive inhibition, manifested as a significantly greater negative compatibility effect than that in controls. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved)  
  Address  
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  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Robbins, T. W., Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Ki Editor  
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  Notes 0006-89501460-2156Accession Number: 2003-01574-013. First Author & Affiliation: Aron, A. R.; Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Release Date: 20040503. Publication Type: Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal. Media Covered: Print. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Original Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor(s): Caudate Nucleus; Huntingtons Disease; Neuropsychology; Priming; Thalamus. Classification: Physical & Somatoform & Psychogenic Disorders (3290). Population: Human (10)Male (30)Female (40). Age Group:Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300); . References Available: Y. Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Aron2003 Serial 6546  
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Author Woodward, T.S.; Menon, M.; Hu, X.; Keefe, R.S.E. url  openurl
  Title Optimization of a multinomial model for investigating hallucinations and delusions with source monitoring Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Schizophrenia Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 85 Issue 1 Pages 106-112  
  Keywords hallucinations; delusions; source monitoring; multinomial model; schizophrenia; Models  
  Abstract Studies of source monitoring have played an important role in cognitive investigations of the inner/outer confusions that characterize hallucinations and delusions in schizophrenia, and multinomial modelling is a statistical/cognitive modelling technique that provides a powerful method for analyzing source monitoring data. The purpose of the current work is to describe how multinomial models can be optimized to answer direct questions about hallucinations and delusions in schizophrenia research. To demonstrate this, we present a reanalysis of previously published source monitoring data, comparing a group of patients with schneiderian first rank symptoms to a group without schneiderian first rank symptoms. The main findings of this analysis were (1) impaired recognition of self-generated items and (2) evidence that impaired source discrimination of perceived items is accompanied by an internalization bias in the target symptom group. Statistical and cognitive interpretations of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)  
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  Publisher Elsevier Science Place of Publication Woodward, Todd S., Department of Research, Riverview Hospital, Room 105, Administration Building, 26 Editor  
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  Notes 0920-9964Accession Number: 2006-08996-011. First Author & Affiliation: Woodward, Todd S.; Department of Research, Riverview Hospital, Coquitlam, Canada. Other Journal Title: Schizophrenia Research. Release Date: 20060724. Publication Type: Journal (0100) Peer Reviewed Journal (0110). Media Covered: Electronic. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor: Delusions; Hallucinations; Models; Schizophrenia; Source Monitoring. Classification: Schizophrenia & Psychotic States (3213) . Population: Human (10) . Methodology: Empirical Study; Quantitative Study. References Available: Y. Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Woodward2006 Serial 4434  
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Author Jovanovic, T.; Norrholm, S.D.; Keyes, M.; Fiallos, A.; Jovanovic, S.; Myers, K.M.; Davis, M.; Duncan, E.J. url  openurl
  Title Contingency Awareness and Fear Inhibition in a Human Fear-Potentiated Startle Paradigm Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 120 Issue 5 Pages 995-1004  
  Keywords human startle response; contingency awareness; discrimination learning; fear inhibition; Awareness; Fear; Response Inhibition; Startle Reflex  
  Abstract Fear-potentiated startle is defined as an increase in the magnitude of the startle reflex in the presence of a stimulus that was previously paired with an aversive event. It has been proposed that a subject's awareness of the contingencies in the experiment may affect fear-potentiated startle. The authors adapted a conditional discrimination procedure (AX+/BX-), previously validated in animals, to a human fear-potentiated startle paradigm in 50 healthy volunteers. This paradigm allows for an assessment of fear-potentiated startle during threat conditions as well as inhibition of fear-potentiated startle during safety conditions. A response keypad was used to assess contingency awareness on a trial-by-trial basis. Both aware and unaware subjects showed fear-potentiated startle. However, awareness was related to stimulus discrimination and fear inhibition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)  
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  Publisher American Psychological Association Place of Publication Jovanovic, Tanja, Mental Health Service/116A, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 1670 Clairmon Editor  
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  Notes 0735-7044Accession Number: 2006-12871-001. First Author & Affiliation: Jovanovic, Tanja; Mental Health Service/116A, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, US. Other Journal Title: Behavioral Neuroscience. Release Date: 20061002. Publication Type: Journal (0100) Peer Reviewed Journal (0110). Media Covered: Electronic. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor: Awareness; Discrimination Learning; Fear; Response Inhibition; Startle Reflex. Classification: Psychophysiology (2560) . Population: Human (10) Male (30) Female (40) . Location: US. Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300) Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs) (320) Thirties (30-39 yrs) (340) Middle Age (40-64 yrs) (360) Aged (65 yrs & older) (380) . Grant Information: This research was supported by the Mental Health Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center; the Science and Technology Center Program, Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, National Science Foundation under Agreement No. IBN-9876754 (Venture grant to Erica J. Duncan, principal investigator [PI]); the American Psychiatric Association and GlaxoSmithKline (Erica J. Duncan, PI); National Institute of Mental Health Grants 1R24MH067314-01A1 (B. Rothbaum, PI) and R37 MH47840 (Michael Davis, PI); Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Fellowship 1F32 MH070129-01A2 (Tanja Jovanovic, PI); and the Woodruff Foundation, Emory University School of Medicine. Tests & Measures: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; . Methodology: Empirical Study; Quantitative Study. References Available: Y. Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Jovanovic2006 Serial 5526  
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