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Author Araya, T.
Title Stereotypes: Suppression, forgetting, and false memory Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Nordic Journal of Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal
Volume Vol 57(5) Issue 5 Pages pp.-394.
Keywords stereotypes; false memory; forgetting; recall; recognition; suppression; *False Memory; *Forgetting; *Recall (Learning); *Stereotyped Attitudes; *Suppression (Defense Mechanism); Recognition (Learning
Abstract This thesis presents four studies investigating: (1) whether incidentally primed control-related words can attenuate the impact of activated stereotypes on subsequent evaluation of a target person, (2) the impact of motivated forgetting on the recall of stereotypically congruent and incongruent information, and (3) the impact of a directed forgetting instruction on the false recall and recognition of nonpresented stereotypical information. The thesis presents a review and a discussion of some of the theoretical underpinnings of the extant literature on stereotyping and intergroup relations and of the social implications of the present findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2003 APA, all rights reserved)
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ISSN 0803-9488 (Print) ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Araya2003 Serial 6551
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Author Wühr, P.
Title Evidence for gating of direct response activation in the Simon task Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Psychonomic Bulletin & Review Abbreviated Journal
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 282-288
Keywords gating; response activation; Simon task; Simon effect; stimulus position; Sensory Gating; Spatial Organization; Stimulus Parameters
Abstract The Simon effect denotes faster responses when the task-irrelevant stimulus position corresponds to the response position than when it does not. Accounts of this effect assume that stimulus position automatically activates a spatially corresponding response while the correct response is being computed. Yet the Simon effect has been found to be reduced after noncorresponding trials. Some authors have interpreted these sequential modulations of the Simon effect as evidence for a mechanism gating position-based response activation. Alternatively, sequential modulations have been explained in terms of feature-integration processes, which depend upon the fact that different sequences of spatial-correspondence conditions covary with different degrees of feature overlap between subsequent trials. The present study investigates whether sequential modulations of the Simon effect can occur when feature overlap in the different conditions is the same. Therefore, a Simon task with four stimulus positions and two response positions was used. Sequential modulations of the Simon effect were found in trial sequences with constant amounts of feature overlap between trials. Although the feature-integration account cannot explain this result, it is consistent with the idea of a gating (i.e., cognitive control) mechanism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)
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Publisher Psychonomic Society Place of Publication WÃRhr, Peter, Institut fur Psychologie I, Friedrich-Alexander Universitat, Kochstrasse 4, 91054, Erl Editor
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Notes 1069-9384Accession Number: 2005-07095-007. First Author & Affiliation: WÃRhr, Peter; Friedrich-Alexander Universitìt, Erlangen, Germany. Release Date: 20050718. Publication Type: Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal. Media Covered: Print. Media Available: Electronic; Print. Document Type: Original Journal Article. Language: English. Major Descriptor(s): Sensory Gating; Spatial Organization; Stimulus Parameters. Classification: Human Experimental Psychology (2300). Population: Human (10)Male (30)Female (40). Age Group:Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300); . References Available: Y. Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Wühr2005 Serial 4431
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Author Moustafa, M.; Bullock, A.J.; Creagh, F.M.; Heller, S.; Jeffcoate, W.; Game, F.; Amery, C.; Tesfaye, S.; Ince, Z.; Haddow, D.B.; MacNeil, S.
Title Randomized, controlled, single-blind study on use of autologous keratinocytes on a transfer dressing to treat nonhealing diabetic ulcers Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Regen Med Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 887-902
Keywords Adult; Aged; Bandages; Cell Line; Diabetic Foot; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Keratinocytes; Leg Ulcer; Male; Middle Aged; Single-Blind Method; Treatment Outcome; Wound Healing
Abstract AIM: To compare the rate of healing of diabetic neuropathic ulcers using cultured autologous keratinocytes delivered on chemically defined transfer discs (Myskin) (active treatment) versus healing obtained with cell-free discs (placebo). MATERIALS AND METHODS: After a 4-week lead-in period patients (randomly assigned) received active or placebo treatments weekly for 6 weeks. All patients then received active treatments for a maximum of 12 treatments where required. Altogether, 16 patients with a total of 21 ulcers resistant to conventional therapy were recruited from four specialist diabetic centers in three cities. RESULTS: All 21 ulcers were treated and of these ten healed and eight improved, with two failing to respond (one ulcer was lost due to autoamputation). For analysis according to the study criteria, however, only the 12 patients with 12 index ulcers who completed treatment protocols were eligible – five in the placebo group and seven in the active group. Of these, five ulcers healed completely and seven were reduced by more than 50%. Complete healing took a median of ten active applications. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated regular applications of the patient's keratinocytes, delivered on the carrier dressing, initiated wound healing in ulcers resistant to conventional therapy, with 18 out of 21 ulcers responding. The healing observed did not appear attributable to patient recruitment or the cell-free carrier dressing but to the delivery of the cultured cells.
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ISSN 1746-076x ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Moustafa2007 Serial 2205
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Author Ferrari, G.L.; Marques, J.L.B.; Gandhi, R.A.; Emery, C.J.; Tesfaye, S.; Heller, S.R.; Schneider, F.K.; Gamba, H.R.
Title An approach to the assessment of diabetic neuropathy based on dynamic pupillometry Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2007 Issue Pages 557-560
Keywords Adaptation, Ocular; Diabetic Neuropathies; Diagnosis, Differential; Female; Humans; Light; Male; Predictive Value of Tests; Pupil; Reflex, Pupillary; Time Factors
Abstract Autonomic neuropathy (AN) is a common and serious complication of diabetes. Early detection is essential to enable appropriate interventional therapy. It has long been recognized that subjects with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are at much greater risk of developing AN, but there is currently no simple screening tool to assess them. The aim of this study was to investigate pupil responsiveness in diabetic subjects with and without DPN using dynamic pupillometry. During the first test, one flash was administered and the pupil response recorded for 3 seconds. In the second test, twenty-five flashes at one-second intervals were administered and the pupil response recorded for 30 seconds. Several time related parameters were computed from the results. A total of 29 diabetic subjects (17 no DPN, 12 DPN) and 25 healthy volunteers took part in the study. In the first test, pupil-iris ratios in darkness, large deviation and plateau were significantly different between groups. Latency time from flash exposure to the start of constriction was significantly longer in diabetic subjects with DPN compared to healthy volunteers. There was no difference in latency times of largest deviation, plateau or duration of constriction between groups. In the second test, the pupil-iris ratios evaluated in the frame preceding the tenth and the twenty-fifth light flash were significantly greater in healthy volunteers than diabetic subjects with DPN. Latency time from the tenth and twenty-fifth flash exposure to the start of constriction was significantly shorter in healthy volunteers than in diabetic subjects with DPN.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1557-170x ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Ferrari2007 Serial 2206
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Author Heller, S.R.
Title Self monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Bmj Abbreviated Journal
Volume 335 Issue 7611 Pages 105-106
Keywords Blood Glucose; Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Humans
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1468-5833 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Heller2007 Serial 2207
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