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Author Malik, N.; Wang, X.; Shah, S.; Efthymiou, A.G.; Yan, B.; Heman-Ackah, S.; Zhan, M.; Rao, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the gene expression profiles of human fetal cortical astrocytes with pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells identifies human astrocyte markers and signaling pathways and transcription factors active in human astrocytes Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages (down) e96139  
  Keywords Astrocytes/*metabolism; Biomarkers/metabolism; Cell Dedifferentiation; Cells, Cultured; Cerebral Cortex/cytology; Fetus/cytology; Gene Ontology; Humans; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*metabolism; Neural Stem Cells/physiology; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Signal Transduction; Transcription Factors/*genetics/metabolism; *Transcriptome; Up-Regulation  
  Abstract Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease.  
  Address National Institutes of Health, NIAMS, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America; National Institutes of Health, NIH Center for Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24848099; PMCID:PMC4029581 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 16827  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, M.; Zhao, D.; Hrabovsky, A.; Pedrosa, E.; Zheng, D.; Lachman, H.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Heat shock alters the expression of schizophrenia and autism candidate genes in an induced pluripotent stem cell model of the human telencephalon Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 4 Pages (down) e94968  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Autistic Disorder/*genetics; Case-Control Studies; Cluster Analysis; Female; Fibroblasts/cytology/metabolism; Gene Expression Profiling; *Gene Expression Regulation; Gene Regulatory Networks; *Hot Temperature; Humans; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism; Male; Reproducibility of Results; Schizophrenia/*genetics; Skin/cytology; Telencephalon/*metabolism  
  Abstract Schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorders, although environmental factors, such as maternal immune activation (MIA), play a role as well. Cytokines mediate the effects of MIA on neurogenesis and behavior in animal models. However, MIA stimulators can also induce a febrile reaction, which could have independent effects on neurogenesis through heat shock (HS)-regulated cellular stress pathways. However, this has not been well-studied. To help understand the role of fever in MIA, we used a recently described model of human brain development in which induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differentiate into 3-dimensional neuronal aggregates that resemble a first trimester telencephalon. RNA-seq was carried out on aggregates that were heat shocked at 39 degrees C for 24 hours, along with their control partners maintained at 37 degrees C. 186 genes showed significant differences in expression following HS (p<0.05), including known HS-inducible genes, as expected, as well as those coding for NGFR and a number of SZ and ASD candidates, including SMARCA2, DPP10, ARNT2, AHI1 and ZNF804A. The degree to which the expression of these genes decrease or increase during HS is similar to that found in copy loss and copy gain copy number variants (CNVs), although the effects of HS are likely to be transient. The dramatic effect on the expression of some SZ and ASD genes places HS, and perhaps other cellular stressors, into a common conceptual framework with disease-causing genetic variants. The findings also suggest that some candidate genes that are assumed to have a relatively limited impact on SZ and ASD pathogenesis based on a small number of positive genetic findings, such as SMARCA2 and ARNT2, may in fact have a much more substantial role in these disorders – as targets of common environmental stressors.  
  Address Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America; Dominick Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America; Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24736721; PMCID:PMC3988108 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 16832  
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Author Eisele, C.; Nevsky, A.Y.; Schiller, S. url  openurl
  Title Laboratory test of the isotropy of light propagation at the 10-17 level Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Physical review letters Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 103 Issue 9 Pages (down) 090401  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ eisele_laboratory_2009 Serial 14224  
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Author Chen, C.; Kim, W.-Y.; Jiang, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brain generated by neonatally engrafted human iPSC-derived primitive neural progenitor cells Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication JCI Insight Abbreviated Journal JCI Insight  
  Volume 1 Issue 19 Pages (down) e88632  
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  Abstract The creation of a humanized chimeric mouse nervous system permits the study of human neural development and disease pathogenesis using human cells in vivo. Humanized glial chimeric mice with the brain and spinal cord being colonized by human glial cells have been successfully generated. However, generation of humanized chimeric mouse brains repopulated by human neurons to possess a high degree of chimerism have not been well studied. Here we created humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brains by neonatally engrafting the distinct and highly neurogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived rosette-type primitive neural progenitors. These neural progenitors predominantly differentiate to neurons, which disperse widely throughout the mouse brain with infiltration of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 6 and 13 months after transplantation. Building upon the hiPSC technology, we propose that this potentially unique humanized neuronal chimeric mouse model will provide profound opportunities to define the structure, function, and plasticity of neural networks containing human neurons derived from a broad variety of neurological disorders.  
  Address Department of Developmental Neuroscience, Munroe-Meyer Institute,; Holland Regenerative Medicine Program, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA  
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  ISSN 2379-3708 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27882348; PMCID:PMC5111502 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 16640  
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Author Feng, H.; Ding, D.; Li, H.; Lu, S.; Pan, S.; Chen, X.; Ren, G. openurl 
  Title Annealing effects on Czochralski grown Lu2Si2O7:Ce3+ crystals under different atmosphere Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication J. Appl. Phys. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 103 Issue Pages (down) 083109  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 17777  
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