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Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 81-91  
  Keywords dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Lara, R.J.; Eicken, H.; Kattner, G.; Skoog, A. url  openurl
  Title Dissolved organic matter in Arctic multi-year sea ice during winter: major components and relationship to ice characteristics Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 1995 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume 15 Issue 6 Pages 447-483  
  Keywords sea ice; Arctic; Dom  
  Abstract Ice cores were collected between 10.03.93 and 15.03.93 along a 200 m profile on a large ice floe in Fram Strait. The ice was typical of Arctic multi-year ice, having a mean thickness along the profile of 2.56 ±0.53 m. It consisted mostly of columnar ice (83%) grown through congelation of seawater at the ice bottom, and the salinity profiles were characterized by a linear increase from 0 psu at the top to values ranging between 3 and 5 psu at depth. Distributions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) and major nutrients were compared with ice texture, salinity and chlorophyll a. DOC, DON, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), NH?? and NO?? were present in concentrations in excess of that predicted by dilution curves derived from Arctic surface water values. Only NO?? was depleted, although not exhausted. High DOC and DON values in conjunction with high NH?? levels indicated that a significant proportion of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) was a result of decomposition/grazing of ice algae and/or detritus. The combination of high NH?? and NO?? points to regeneration of nitrogen compounds. There was no significant correlation between DOC and Chl a in contrast to DON, which had a positively significant correlation with both salinity and Chl a, and the distribution of DOM in the cores might best be described as a combination of both physical and biological processes. There was no correlation between DOC and DON suggesting an uncoupling of DOC and DON dynamics in multi year ice.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes D Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1995 Serial 763  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Variation in phytoplankton standing stock, chemical composition and physiology during sea-ice formation in the southeastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 1993 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Mar Biol Ecol  
  Volume 173 Issue 2 Pages 211-230  
  Keywords Antarctic; ecophysiology; ice algae; phytoplankton; primary production; sea-ice formation; biochemical composition; plant physiology; Psw; Weddell Sea; population number; sea ice; algae; standing crop  
  Abstract Changes in physico-chemical conditions, phytoplankton biomass, biochemical composition and primary productivity were investigated during autumnal sea-ice formation in the southeastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica. During sea-ice growth, brine salinities gradually increased with decreasing temperature. Nutrient concentrations in the brine of sea ice older than 2 weeks were lower than calculated from initial surface seawater values. The concomittant accumulation of phytoplankton biomass could not be explained solely by physical enrichment. We suggest that several microalgal species retained the capacity to assimilate nutrients and continued to grow in newly formed sea ice. However, nutrient depletions were moderate, and biochemical analyses did not indicate nutrient stress of algal metabolism. Relative abundance of smaller diatom species increased during ice growth, suggesting that pore space available for colonization in conjunction with physiological acclimation capacity were major factors determining successional patterns in recently formed sea ice. Even though ice algal assemblages apparently sustained the capacity to acclimate to reduced irradiances brought about by ice growth and increasing snow cover, maximum primary production was considerably lower than values usually reported from spring and summer ice communities. Therefore, autumnal primary production in newly formed sea ice may not add greatly to total annual production, but may provide an important food source for ice-associated grazers during the winter period, when phytoplankton biomass in the water column is extremely low.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz+Thomas1993 Serial 734  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title Allocation of photoassimilated carbon into major algal metabolite fractions: Variation between two diatom species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 1993 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 281-286  
  Keywords carbon fixation; metabolites; biomass; Nitzschia curta; Chaetoceros; Psw; Weddell Sea  
  Abstract Distribution of photoassimilated carbon into major metabolite classes differed between two Antarctic diatom species, Nitzschia curta and a small unicellular Chaetoceros sp.. Time course uptake studies (over 54 h) revealed that¹?C allocation appeared to be equilibrated after approximately 8 h at light saturated photosynthesis. During short term dark periods (6 h), polysaccharides as well as low-molecular-weight compounds were catabolised to sustain protein synthesis in the dark, whilst lipid reserves were not mobilised for this process. Experiments with these two species were conducted at 0 and -1.5 degree C, although no difference in the distribution of radiolabel was measured between the two temperatures. It is hypothesised that under near-optimal conditions fast growing species are characterised by a high carbon turnover associated with a rapid flow of newly assimilated carbon into polymeric compound classes. On the other hand, slower growing species (such as N. curta) may store a significant amount of surplus carbon in the low-molecular-weight metabolite fraction. Species specific preferences were observed when comparing the accumulation of radiolabel into the lipid pools.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Bibliogr.: 48 ref.; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Gleitz1993 Serial 760  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Physiological responses of a small Antarctic diatom (Chaetoceros sp.) to simulated environmental constraints associated with sea-ice formation Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 1992 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol Prog Ser  
  Volume 88 Issue 2-3 Pages 271-278  
  Keywords plant physiology; abiotic factors; temperature effects; salinity effects; irradiance; sea ice; growth; photosynthesis; Chaetoceros; Psw; Weddell Sea; simulation  
  Abstract The physiological responses of a small unicellular Chaetoceros species, isolated from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, to changes in temperature, salinity and irradiance simulating those that occur during new-ice formation were investigated. The combination of increased salinity, increased quantum irradiance and decreased temperature significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates compared to the control, although cellular metabolism was not inhibited. The cells retained the capacity to photoacclimate, which was observed in the variations in cellular chlorophyll a concentrations and carbon allocation patterns. In terms of photosynthesis, a doubling of quantum irradiance apparently compensated for the adverse effects of increased salinity and lowered temperature. It is thus hypothesized that at least some species of the late season phytoplankton population survive incorporation into ice and continue to photosynthesize and grow under the extreme conditions encountered during sea-ice formation.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Inter-Research Place of Publication Oldendorf/Luhe Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Bibliogr.: 38 ref.; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz+Thomas1992 Serial 735  
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