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Author Carver, S.M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Thermophilic, anaerobic co-digestion of microalgal biomass and cellulose for H2 production Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biodegradation Abbreviated Journal Biodegradation  
  Volume (down) 22 Issue 4 Pages 805-814  
  Keywords Anaerobiosis; Biodegradation, Environmental; Biofuels; Biomass; Bioreactors; Cellulose/*metabolism; Chlorella vulgaris/*metabolism/microbiology; Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid; Fatty Acids, Volatile/biosynthesis; *Fermentation; *Hydrogen/metabolism; Microalgae/*metabolism/microbiology; Microbial Consortia  
  Abstract Microalgal biomass has been a focus in the sustainable energy field, especially biodiesel production. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating microalgal biomass and cellulose by anaerobic digestion for H2 production. A microbial consortium, TC60, known to degrade cellulose and other plant polymers, was enriched on a mixture of cellulose and green microalgal biomass of Dunaliella tertiolecta, a marine species, or Chlorella vulgaris, a freshwater species. After five enrichment steps at 60 degrees C, hydrogen yields increased at least 10% under all conditions. Anaerobic digestion of D. tertiolecta and cellulose by TC60 produced 7.7 mmol H2/g volatile solids (VS) which were higher than the levels (2.9-4.2 mmol/g VS) obtained with cellulose and C. vulgaris biomass. Both microalgal slurries contained satellite prokaryotes. The C. vulgaris slurry, without TC60 inoculation, generated H2 levels on par with that of TC60 on cellulose alone. The biomass-fed anaerobic digestion resulted in large shifts in short chain fatty acid concentrations and increased ammonium levels. Growth and H2 production increased when TC60 was grown on a combination of D. tertiolecta and cellulose due to nutrients released from algal cells via lysis. The results indicated that satellite heterotrophs from C. vulgaris produced H2 but the Chlorella biomass was not substantially degraded by TC60. To date, this is the first study to examine H2 production by anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass. The results indicate that H2 production is feasible but higher yields could be achieved by optimization of the bioprocess conditions including biomass pretreatment.  
  Address Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA. carver.84@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0923-9820 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20878208 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12982  
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Author Arrigo, K.R.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Large scale importance of sea ice biology in the Southern Ocean Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume (down) 16 Issue 4 Pages 471-486  
  Keywords algae; Antarctic; biogeochemistry; carbon cycle; primary production; Full Data Records  
  Abstract Despite being one of the largest biomes on earth, sea ice ecosystems have only received intensive study over the past 30 years. Sea ice is a unique habitat for assemblages of bacteria, algae, protists, and invertebrates that grow within a matrix dominated by strong gradients in temperature, salinity, nutrients, and UV and visible radiation. A suite of physiological adaptations allow these organisms to thrive in ice, where their enormous biomass makes them a fundamental component of polar ecosystems. Sea ice algae are an important energy and nutritional source for invertebrates such as juvenile krill, accounting for up to 25% of total annual primary production in ice-covered waters. The ability of ice algae to produce large amounts of UV absorbing compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids makes them even more important to organisms like krill that can incorporate these sunscreens into their own tissues. Furthermore, the nutrient and light conditions in which sea ice algae thrive induce them to synthesize enhanced concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, a vital constituent of the diet of grazing organisms, especially during winter. Finally, sea ice bacteria and algae have become the focus of biotechnology, and are being considered as proxies of possible life forms on ice-covered extraterrestrial systems. An analysis of how the balance between sea ice and pelagic production might change under a warming scenario indicates that when current levels of primary production and changes in the areas of sea ice habitats are taken into account, the expected 25% loss of sea ice over the next century would increase primary production in the Southern Ocean by approximately 10%, resulting in a slight negative feedback on climate warming.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Arrigo+Thomas2004 Serial 729  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Lara, R.J.; Eicken, H.; Kattner, G.; Skoog, A. url  openurl
  Title Dissolved organic matter in Arctic multi-year sea ice during winter: major components and relationship to ice characteristics Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume (down) 15 Issue 6 Pages 447-483  
  Keywords sea ice; Arctic; Dom  
  Abstract Ice cores were collected between 10.03.93 and 15.03.93 along a 200 m profile on a large ice floe in Fram Strait. The ice was typical of Arctic multi-year ice, having a mean thickness along the profile of 2.56 ±0.53 m. It consisted mostly of columnar ice (83%) grown through congelation of seawater at the ice bottom, and the salinity profiles were characterized by a linear increase from 0 psu at the top to values ranging between 3 and 5 psu at depth. Distributions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) and major nutrients were compared with ice texture, salinity and chlorophyll a. DOC, DON, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), NH?? and NO?? were present in concentrations in excess of that predicted by dilution curves derived from Arctic surface water values. Only NO?? was depleted, although not exhausted. High DOC and DON values in conjunction with high NH?? levels indicated that a significant proportion of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) was a result of decomposition/grazing of ice algae and/or detritus. The combination of high NH?? and NO?? points to regeneration of nitrogen compounds. There was no significant correlation between DOC and Chl a in contrast to DON, which had a positively significant correlation with both salinity and Chl a, and the distribution of DOM in the cores might best be described as a combination of both physical and biological processes. There was no correlation between DOC and DON suggesting an uncoupling of DOC and DON dynamics in multi year ice.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes D Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1995 Serial 763  
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Author Herborg, L.-M.; Thomas, D.N.; Kennedy, H.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Dissolved carbohydrates in Antarctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume (down) 13 Issue 2 Pages 119-125  
  Keywords Doc; Mcho; Pcho; sea ice; bacteria; carbon cycling; diatoms; dissolved organic carbon; monocarbohydrates; polycarbohydrates  
  Abstract Concentrations of dissolved monocarbohydrates (MCHO) and polycarbohydrates (PCHO) were analysed in a variety of ice habitats from summer Weddell Sea sea ice (surface ponds, ice cores, gap layers and platelet ice). The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in these habitats was also measured and the contribution of carbohydrate to this pool was assessed. The DOC concentrations within all sea ice habitats were high compared to surface seawater concentrations with values up to 958µMC being measured. Total carbohydrates (TCHO) were highest in the ice cores and platelet ice samples, up to 3 1% of the DOC pool, a reflection of the high algal biomass in these two habitat classes. TCHO in the other habitats ranged between 10% and 29% of DOC. The ratios of MCHO to PCHO varied considerably between the ice habitats: in surface ponds and ice cores MCHO was 70% of the TCHO pool, whereas in gap layers and platelet ice there were lower PCHO concentrations resulting in MCHO being 88% of TCHO.  
  Address  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Herborg++2001 Serial 743  
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Author Schnack-Schiel, S.B.; Thomas, D.N.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Alheit, R. url  openurl
  Title The occurrence of the copepods Stephos longipes (Calanoida) and Drescheriella glacialis (Harpacticoida) in summer sea ice in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarctic Sci  
  Volume (down) 13 Issue 2 Pages 150-157  
  Keywords copepods; Drescheriella glacialis; sea ice; seasonality; Stephos longipes  
  Abstract In January to March 1997, a RV Polarstern cruise that transected the Weddell Sea resulted in samples being taken in thick pack ice in the south-eastern Weddell Sea and then along the marginal ice edge towards the Antarctic Peninsula. Several ice types were thus sampled over a wide geographic area during late summer/early autumn. Common features of the first warm period was the occurrence of surface ponds, and that many floes had quasi-continuous horizontal gaps, underlying a layer of ice and metamorphic snow. With the onset of cold air temperatures in late February the gaps rapidly refroze. The calanoid copepod Stephos longipes occurred in all habitats encountered and showed highest numbers in the surface ice in summer, in the gap water during both seasons and in the refrozen gap water in autumn. Nauplii outnumbered copepodids in the surface ice and refrozen gap water, while in the gap water copepodids, mainly stages CI-CIII in summer and CII-CIV in autumn, comprised about 70% of the total population. The harpacticoid species Drescheriella glacialis did not occur in all habitats and was missing in surface ponds and new ice. Nauplii of D. glacialis were rarely found in gapwater, but predominated in the refrozen gaps.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Schnack-Schiel++2001_2 Serial 753  
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