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Author Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photosynthetic microbes in freezing deserts Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Trends in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Trends Microbiol  
  Volume (down) 13 Issue 3 Pages 87-88  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Polar deserts are not devoid of life despite the extreme low temperature and scarcity of water. Recently, patterned stone fields – caused by periglacial activity – have been surveyed in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was found that the productivity of the cyanobacteria and algae (hypoliths) that colonise the underside of the stones is strongly related to the pattern of the stones. The hypolith assemblages were in some cases as productive as lichens, bryophytes and plants that resided nearby.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0966-842X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2005 Serial 755  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title Allocation of photoassimilated carbon into major algal metabolite fractions: Variation between two diatom species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume (down) 13 Issue 4 Pages 281-286  
  Keywords carbon fixation; metabolites; biomass; Nitzschia curta; Chaetoceros; Psw; Weddell Sea  
  Abstract Distribution of photoassimilated carbon into major metabolite classes differed between two Antarctic diatom species, Nitzschia curta and a small unicellular Chaetoceros sp.. Time course uptake studies (over 54 h) revealed that¹?C allocation appeared to be equilibrated after approximately 8 h at light saturated photosynthesis. During short term dark periods (6 h), polysaccharides as well as low-molecular-weight compounds were catabolised to sustain protein synthesis in the dark, whilst lipid reserves were not mobilised for this process. Experiments with these two species were conducted at 0 and -1.5 degree C, although no difference in the distribution of radiolabel was measured between the two temperatures. It is hypothesised that under near-optimal conditions fast growing species are characterised by a high carbon turnover associated with a rapid flow of newly assimilated carbon into polymeric compound classes. On the other hand, slower growing species (such as N. curta) may store a significant amount of surplus carbon in the low-molecular-weight metabolite fraction. Species specific preferences were observed when comparing the accumulation of radiolabel into the lipid pools.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Bibliogr.: 48 ref.; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Gleitz1993 Serial 760  
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Author Mock, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Recent advances in sea-ice microbiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ Microbiol  
  Volume (down) 7 Issue 5 Pages 605-619  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Over the past 50 years there has been much effort invested in the investigation of the ecology of sea ice. Sea ice is an ephemeral feature of the Arctic and Southern Oceans and smaller water bodies such as the Baltic and Caspian Seas. The semisolid ice matrix provides a range of habitats in which a diverse range of microbial organisms thrive. In the past 5 years there has been considerable steps forward in sea-ice research, in particular regarding the analysis of sea-ice microstructure and the investigation of the diversity and adaptation of microbial communities. These studies include: (i) controlled simulated and in situ studies on a micrometer scale to unravel the dynamic of the microhabitat with consequences for the organisms; (ii) the introduction of molecular approaches to uncover the diversity of uncultured still unknown microorganisms; and (iii) studies into the molecular adaptation of selected model organisms to the extreme environment. This minireview presents some of the most recent findings from sea-ice studies within the framework of these aims.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing, Inc. Place of Publication Oxford Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Minireview Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Mock+Thomas2005 Serial 750  
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Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biogenic hydrogen and methane production from Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta biomass Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biotechnology for Biofuels Abbreviated Journal Biotechnol Biofuels  
  Volume (down) 4 Issue 1 Pages 34  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuel and bioenergy production due to their high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates and no need for external organic carbon supply. In this study, utilization of Chlorella vulgaris (a fresh water microalga) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (a marine microalga) biomass was tested as a feedstock for anaerobic H2 and CH4 production. RESULTS: Anaerobic serum bottle assays were conducted at 37 degrees C with enrichment cultures derived from municipal anaerobic digester sludge. Low levels of H2 were produced by anaerobic enrichment cultures, but H2 was subsequently consumed even in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogens. Without inoculation, algal biomass still produced H2 due to the activities of satellite bacteria associated with algal cultures. CH4 was produced from both types of biomass with anaerobic enrichments. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling indicated the presence of H2-producing and H2-consuming bacteria in the anaerobic enrichment cultures and the presence of H2-producing bacteria among the satellite bacteria in both sources of algal biomass. CONCLUSIONS: H2 production by the satellite bacteria was comparable from D. tertiolecta (12.6 ml H2/g volatile solids (VS)) and from C. vulgaris (10.8 ml H2/g VS), whereas CH4 production was significantly higher from C. vulgaris (286 ml/g VS) than from D. tertiolecta (24 ml/g VS). The high salinity of the D. tertiolecta slurry, prohibitive to methanogens, was the probable reason for lower CH4 production.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1754-6834 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21943287; PMCID:PMC3193024 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12985  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. (eds) url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sea ice – an introduction to its physics, chemistry, biology and geology Type Book Whole
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) Issue Pages 402 pp  
  Keywords Sea Ice  
  Abstract Sea ice, which covers up to 7% of the planet's surface, is a major component of the world's oceans, partly driving ocean circulation and global climate patterns. It provides a habitat for a rich diversity of marine organisms, and is a valuable source of information in studies of global climate change and the evolution of present day life forms. Increasingly, sea ice is being used as a proxy for extraterrestrial ice covered systems.

Sea Ice provides a comprehensive review of our current available knowledge of polar pack ice, the study of which is severely constrained by the logistic difficulties of working in such harsh and remote regions of the earth. The book's editors, Drs Thomas and Dieckmann have drawn together an impressive group of international contributing authors, providing a well-edited and integrated volume, which will stand for many years as the standard work on the subject. Contents of the book include details of the growth, microstructure and properties of sea ice, large-scale variations in thickness and characteristics, its primary production, micro-and macrobiology, sea ice as a habitat for birds and mammals, sea ice biogeochemistry, particulate flux, and the distribution and significance of palaeo sea ice.
 
  Address Thomas: School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, UK; Dieckmann: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Oxford Editor Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-632-05808-0 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 40 Illustrations Approved yes  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ library-34/436/1 Serial 7  
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