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Author Granskog, M.A.; Virkkunen, K.; Thomas, D.N.; Ehn, J.; Kola, H.; Martma, T. url  openurl
  Title Chemical properties of brackish water ice in the Bothnian Bay, the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal J Glaciol  
  Volume (down) 50 Issue 169 Pages 292-302  
  Keywords Dependent Solute Redistribution; Dissolved Organic Matter; Phase Boundary; Sulfate; Binding; Summer; Oxygen; Core; Gulf  
  Abstract The behavior of majors, δ18O, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trace elements was studied during the initial freezing of low-saline water (3 practical salinity units) in a freezing experiment. Samples were also collected from first-year sea ice from pack ice in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. During initial ice formation, the major-ion ratios in sea ice indicated variable behavior, with some ions showing relative enrichment (sulfate, calcium and magnesium), conservative behavior (sodium) or relative depletion (potassium) compared to sea water at the same salinity DOC, iron and aluminum showed enrichment in the ice, while zinc was depleted to salinity. Lead was detected in surface snow-ice layers only, implying atmospheric accumulation. First-year sea ice, with a variable growth and thermal history, showed behavior for major ions similar to that observed in new ice. However, for trace elements the picture was much more complicated, most likely due to active secondary processes such as atmospheric supply and biological activity. Ice growth has a potential impact on the chemical budgets and cycling of some elements, especially those which are selectively rejected/retained during sea-ice formation, particularly in the shallow parts of the Bothnian Bay covered with a land-fast ice cover.  
  Address Granskog: Univ Helsinki, Dept Phys Sci, Div Geophys, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Bothnian Bay Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000227720900014 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2004 Serial 741  
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Author Haas, C.; Thomas, D.N.; Bareiss, J. url  openurl
  Title Surface properties and processes of perennial Antarctic sea ice in summer Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Journal of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal J Glaciol  
  Volume (down) 47 Issue 159 Pages 613-625  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Ice-core and snow data from the Amundsen, Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas, Antarctica, show that the formation of superimposed ice and the development of seawater-filled gap layers with high algal standing stocks is typical of the perennial sea ice in summer. The coarse-grained and dense snow had salinities mostly below 0.1ppt. A layer of fresh superimposed ice had a mean thickness of 0.04-0.12 m. Gap layers 0.04-0.08 m thick extended downwards from 0.02 to 0.14 m below the water level. These gaps were populated by diatom standing stocks up to 439 ?g L?¹ chlorophyll a. We propose a comprehensive heuristic model of summer processes, where warming and the reversal of temperature gradients cause major transformations in snow and ice properties. The warming also causes the reopening of incompletely frozen slush layers caused by flood-freeze cycles during winter. Alternatively, superimposed ice forms at the cold interface between snow and slush in the case of flooding with negative freeboard. Combined, these explain the initial formation of gap layers by abiotic means alone. The upward growth of superimposed ice above the water level competes with a steady submergence of floes due to bottom and internal melting and accumulation of snow.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes IPØ/Tvärrminne Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Haas++2001 Serial 742  
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Author Steffens, M.; Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Luodekari, K.; Papadimitriou, S.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Spatial variation of biogeochemical properties of landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea Type Conference Article
  Year 2006 Publication Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal Ann Glaciol  
  Volume (down) 44 Issue 1 Pages 80-87  
  Keywords Sea ice; Fast ice; Sea ice properties; Ice algae; Chlorophyll; Biogeochemistry; Nutrients (mineral); Particulate organic matter; Dissolved organic matter; Salinity; Spatial scale; Spatial variability; Horizontal patchiness; Sampling design; Brackish water; Ane; Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia  
  Abstract Horizontal variation of landfast sea-ice properties was studied in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea, during March 2004. In order to estimate their variability among and within different spatial levels, 72 ice cores were sampled on five spatial scales (with spacings of 10 cm, 2.5 m, 25 m, 250 m and 2.5 km) using a hierarchical sampling design. Entire cores were melted, and bulk-ice salinity, concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), phaeophytin (Phaeo), dissolved nitrate plus nitrite (DIN) as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were determined. All sampling sites were covered by a 5.5-23 cm thick layer of snow. Ice thicknesses of cores varied from 26 to 58 cm, with bulk-ice salinities ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 as is typical for Baltic Sea ice. Observed values for Chl a (range: 0.8-6.0 μg Chl a l-1; median: 2.9 μg Chl a l -1) and DOC (range: 37-397 μM; median: 95 μM) were comparable to values reported by previous sea-ice studies from the Baltic Sea. Analysis of variance among different spatial levels revealed significant differences on the 2.5 km scale for ice thickness, DOC and Phaeo (with the latter two being positively correlated with ice thickness). For salinity and Chl a, the 250 m scale was found to be the largest scale where significant differences could be detected, while snow depth only varied significantly on the 25 m scale. Variability on the 2.5 m scale contributed significantly to the total variation for ice thickness, salinity, Chl a and DIN. In the case of DON, none of the investigated levels exhibited variation that was significantly different from the considerable amount of variation found between replicate cores. Results from a principal component analysis suggest that ice thickness is one of the main elements structuring the investigated ice habitat on a large scale, while snow depth, nutrients and salinity seem to be of secondary importance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0260-3055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia Expedition Conference International Symposium on Sea Ice, Dunedin (New Zealand), 5-9 Dec 2005  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Steffens++2006 Serial 754  
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Author Brierley, A.S.; Thomas, D.N. openurl 
  Title Ecology of southern ocean pack ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Advances in marine biology Abbreviated Journal Adv Mar Biol  
  Volume (down) 43 Issue Pages 171-276  
  Keywords Animals; Antarctic Regions; Birds; Crustacea; Ecology; *Ecosystem; Environment; Fishes; *Ice; *Marine Biology; Oceans and Seas; Phytoplankton; Population Dynamics; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Seasons; *Seawater; Water Microbiology; Whales  
  Abstract Around Antarctica the annual five-fold growth and decay of sea ice is the most prominent physical process and has a profound impact on marine life there. In winter the pack ice canopy extends to cover almost 20 million square kilometres--some 8% of the southern hemisphere and an area larger than the Antarctic continent itself (13.2 million square kilometres)--and is one of the largest, most dynamic ecosystems on earth. Biological activity is associated with all physical components of the sea-ice system: the sea-ice surface; the internal sea-ice matrix and brine channel system; the underside of sea ice and the waters in the vicinity of sea ice that are modified by the presence of sea ice. Microbial and microalgal communities proliferate on and within sea ice and are grazed by a wide range of proto- and macrozooplankton that inhabit the sea ice in large concentrations. Grazing organisms also exploit biogenic material released from the sea ice at ice break-up or melt. Although rates of primary production in the underlying water column are often low because of shading by sea-ice cover, sea ice itself forms a substratum that provides standing stocks of bacteria, algae and grazers significantly higher than those in ice-free areas. Decay of sea ice in summer releases particulate and dissolved organic matter to the water column, playing a major role in biogeochemical cycling as well as seeding water column phytoplankton blooms. Numerous zooplankton species graze sea-ice algae, benefiting additionally because the overlying sea-ice ceiling provides a refuge from surface predators. Sea ice is an important nursery habitat for Antarctic krill, the pivotal species in the Southern Ocean marine ecosystem. Some deep-water fish migrate to shallow depths beneath sea ice to exploit the elevated concentrations of some zooplankton there. The increased secondary production associated with pack ice and the sea-ice edge is exploited by many higher predators, with seals, seabirds and whales aggregating there. As a result, much of the Southern Ocean pelagic whaling was concentrated at the edge of the marginal ice zone. The extent and duration of sea ice fluctuate periodically under the influence of global climatic phenomena including the El Nino Southern Oscillation. Life cycles of some associated species may reflect this periodicity. With evidence for climatic warming in some regions of Antarctica, there is concern that ecosystem change may be induced by changes in sea-ice extent. The relative abundance of krill and salps appears to change interannually with sea-ice extent, and in warm years, when salps proliferate, krill are scarce and dependent predators suffer severely. Further research on the Southern Ocean sea-ice system is required, not only to further our basic understanding of the ecology, but also to provide ecosystem managers with the information necessary for the development of strategies in response to short- and medium-term environmental changes in Antarctica. Technological advances are delivering new sampling platforms such as autonomous underwater vehicles that are improving vastly our ability to sample the Antarctic under sea-ice environment. Data from such platforms will enhance greatly our understanding of the globally important Southern Ocean sea-ice ecosystem.  
  Address Gatty Marine Laboratory, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK. andrew.brierley@st-andrews.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0065-2881 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12154613 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 317  
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Author Stedmon, C.A.; Thomas, D.N.; Granskog, M.; Kaartokallio, H.; Papadimitriou, S.; Kuosa, H. url  openurl
  Title Characteristics of dissolved organic matter in Baltic coastal sea ice: allochthonous or autochthonous origins? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Environmental Science & Technology Abbreviated Journal Environ Sci Technol  
  Volume (down) 41 Issue 21 Pages 7273-7279  
  Keywords Carbon/analysis; *Humic Substances; Ice Cover/*chemistry; Nitrogen/analysis; Oceans and Seas; Spectrometry, Fluorescence  
  Abstract The origin of dissolved organic matter (DOM) within sea ice in coastal waters of the Baltic Sea was investigated using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis of DOM fluorescence. Sea ice DOM had distinctly different fluorescence characteristics than that of the underlying humic-rich waters and was dominated by protein-like fluorescence signals. PARAFAC analysis identified five fluorescent components, all of which were present in both sea ice and water. Three humic components were negatively correlated to salinity and concluded to be terrestrially derived material. Baltic Sea ice DOM was found to be a mixture of humic material from the underlying water column incorporated during ice formation and autochthonous material produced by organisms within the ice. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations were correlated to the humic fluorescence, indicating that the majority of the organic carbon and nitrogen in Baltic Sea ice is bound in terrestrial humic material trapped within the ice. This has implications for our understanding of sea ice carbon cycling in regions influenced by riverine input (e.g., Baltic and Arctic coastal waters), as the susceptibility of DOM to degradation and remineralization is largely determined by its source.  
  Address Department of Marine Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. cst@dmu.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-936X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18044499 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12979  
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