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Author Granskog, M.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Thomas, D.N.; Vainio, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sea ice in the Baltic Sea – A review Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science Abbreviated Journal Estuar Coast Shelf Sci  
  Volume 70 Issue 1-2 Pages 145-160  
  Keywords sea ice; Baltic Sea; biogeochemistry; plankton; seasons  
  Abstract Although the seasonal ice cover of the Baltic Sea has many similarities to its oceanic counterpart in Polar Seas and Oceans, there are many unique characteristics that mainly result from the brackish waters from which the ice is formed, resulting in low bulk salinities and porosities. In addition, due to the milder climate than Polar regions, the annual maximum ice extent is highly variable, and rain and freeze-melt cycles can occur throughout winter. Up to 35% of the sea ice mass can be composed from metamorphic snow, rather than frozen seawater, and in places snow and superimposed ice can make up to 50% of the total ice thickness. There is pronounced atmospheric deposition of inorganic nutrients and heavy metals onto the ice, and in the Bothnian Bay it is estimated that 5% of the total annual flux of nitrogen and phosphorus and 20–40% of lead and cadmium may be deposited onto the ice fields from the atmosphere. It is yet unclear whether or not the ice is simply a passive store for atmospherically deposited compounds, or if they are transformed through photochemical processes or biological accumulation before released at ice and snow melt.As in Polar sea ice, the Baltic ice can harbour rich biological assemblages, both within the ice itself, and on the peripheries of the ice at the ice/water interface. Much progress has been made in recent years to study the composition of these assemblages as well as measuring biogeochemical processes within the ice related to those in underlying waters. The high dissolved organic matter loading of Baltic waters and ice result in the ice having quite different chemical characteristics than those known from Polar Oceans. The high dissolved organic material load is also responsible in large degree to shape the optical properties of Baltic Sea ice, with high absorption of solar radiation at shorter wavelengths, a prerequisite for active photochemistry of dissolved organic matter.Land-fast ice in the Baltic also greatly alters the mixing characteristics of river waters flowing into coastal waters. River plumes extend under the ice to a much greater distance, and with greater stability than in ice-free conditions. Under-ice plumes not only alter the mixing properties of the waters, but also result in changed ice growth dynamics, and ice biological assemblages, with the underside of the ice being encased, in the extreme case, with a frozen freshwater layer.There is a pronounced gradient in ice types from more saline ice in the south to freshwater ice in the north. The former is characteristically more porous and supports more ice-associated biology than the latter. Ice conditions also vary considerably in different parts of the Baltic Sea, with ice persisting for over half a year in the northernmost part of the Baltic Sea, the Bothnian Bay. In the southern Baltic Sea, ice appears only during severe winters.  
  Address Granskog: Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, P.O. Box 122, FI-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science BV Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2006 Serial 738  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 81-91  
  Keywords dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Variation in phytoplankton standing stock, chemical composition and physiology during sea-ice formation in the southeastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Mar Biol Ecol  
  Volume 173 Issue 2 Pages 211-230  
  Keywords Antarctic; ecophysiology; ice algae; phytoplankton; primary production; sea-ice formation; biochemical composition; plant physiology; Psw; Weddell Sea; population number; sea ice; algae; standing crop  
  Abstract Changes in physico-chemical conditions, phytoplankton biomass, biochemical composition and primary productivity were investigated during autumnal sea-ice formation in the southeastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica. During sea-ice growth, brine salinities gradually increased with decreasing temperature. Nutrient concentrations in the brine of sea ice older than 2 weeks were lower than calculated from initial surface seawater values. The concomittant accumulation of phytoplankton biomass could not be explained solely by physical enrichment. We suggest that several microalgal species retained the capacity to assimilate nutrients and continued to grow in newly formed sea ice. However, nutrient depletions were moderate, and biochemical analyses did not indicate nutrient stress of algal metabolism. Relative abundance of smaller diatom species increased during ice growth, suggesting that pore space available for colonization in conjunction with physiological acclimation capacity were major factors determining successional patterns in recently formed sea ice. Even though ice algal assemblages apparently sustained the capacity to acclimate to reduced irradiances brought about by ice growth and increasing snow cover, maximum primary production was considerably lower than values usually reported from spring and summer ice communities. Therefore, autumnal primary production in newly formed sea ice may not add greatly to total annual production, but may provide an important food source for ice-associated grazers during the winter period, when phytoplankton biomass in the water column is extremely low.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz+Thomas1993 Serial 734  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Baumann, M.E.M.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title Efficiency of carbon assimilation and photoacclimation in a small unicellular Chaetoceros species from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica): Influence of temperature and irradiance Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Mar Biol Ecol  
  Volume 157 Issue 2 Pages 195-209  
  Keywords photosynthesis; Psw; Weddell Sea; Chaetoceros; temperature effects; irradiance; light effects; acclimation; respiration; carbon fixation; low temperature; polar waters; Antarctica; water temperature  
  Abstract It is well established that Antarctic phytoplankton and sea-ice algae are able to thrive at low temperatures and it has been proposed that a reduction in respiration may be important in enabling them to do this. This possibility was studied in an Antarctic clone of a small unicellular Chaetoceros species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica), using comparative measurements of C assimilation during long- and short-term incubation series over a range of temperatures (-1.5 to 4 °C) at two irradiances (5 and 55 µmol m?²/s). Even though doubling times varied considerably, the total amount of C assimilated per cell per generation time was similar at each of the temperature and light conditions. However, over one cell cycle, significant respiratory C losses were determined by divergences in C assimilation patterns between cumulative and long-term incubations at both light intensities at 0 and 4 °C. At -1.5 °C, insignificant C losses were recorded. No significant extracellular release of dissolved organic material (DOC) was observed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1992 Serial 757  
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Author Arrigo, K.R.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Large scale importance of sea ice biology in the Southern Ocean Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 471-486  
  Keywords algae; Antarctic; biogeochemistry; carbon cycle; primary production; Full Data Records  
  Abstract Despite being one of the largest biomes on earth, sea ice ecosystems have only received intensive study over the past 30 years. Sea ice is a unique habitat for assemblages of bacteria, algae, protists, and invertebrates that grow within a matrix dominated by strong gradients in temperature, salinity, nutrients, and UV and visible radiation. A suite of physiological adaptations allow these organisms to thrive in ice, where their enormous biomass makes them a fundamental component of polar ecosystems. Sea ice algae are an important energy and nutritional source for invertebrates such as juvenile krill, accounting for up to 25% of total annual primary production in ice-covered waters. The ability of ice algae to produce large amounts of UV absorbing compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids makes them even more important to organisms like krill that can incorporate these sunscreens into their own tissues. Furthermore, the nutrient and light conditions in which sea ice algae thrive induce them to synthesize enhanced concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, a vital constituent of the diet of grazing organisms, especially during winter. Finally, sea ice bacteria and algae have become the focus of biotechnology, and are being considered as proxies of possible life forms on ice-covered extraterrestrial systems. An analysis of how the balance between sea ice and pelagic production might change under a warming scenario indicates that when current levels of primary production and changes in the areas of sea ice habitats are taken into account, the expected 25% loss of sea ice over the next century would increase primary production in the Southern Ocean by approximately 10%, resulting in a slight negative feedback on climate warming.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Arrigo+Thomas2004 Serial 729  
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