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Author Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Thomas, D.N.; Granskog, M.A.; Kivi, K. url  openurl
  Title (up) Biomass, composition and activity of organism assemblages along a salinity gradient in sea ice subjected to river discharge in the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume 30 Issue 2 Pages 183-197  
  Keywords  
  Abstract A study was undertaken to examine the activity and composition of the seasonal Baltic Sea land-fast sea-ice biota along a salinity gradient in March 2003 in a coastal location in the SW coast of Finland. Using a multi-variable data set, the less well-known algal and protozoan communities, and algal and bacterial production in relation to the physical and chemical environment were investigated. Also, the first coincident measurements of bacterial production and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in a sea-ice system are reported. Communities in sea ice were clearly autotrophy-dominated with algal biomass representing 79% of the total biomass. Protozoa and rotifers made up 18% of biomass in the ice and bacteria only 3%. Highest biomasses were found in mid-transect bottom ice. Water column assemblages were clearly more heterotrophic: 39% algae, 12% bacteria and 49% for rotifers and protozoa. Few significant correlations existed between DOM and bacterial variables, reflecting the complex origin of ice DOM. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (DOC, DON and DOP) were also uncoupled. A functional microbial loop is likely to be present in the studied ice. Existence of an under-ice freshwater plume affects the ecosystem functioning: Under-ice water communities are influenced directly by river-water mixing, whereas the ice system seems to be more independent–the interaction mainly taking place through the formation of active bottom communities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Sampling: Nine stations along a 40km salinity gradient from inner Pojo Bay through the Archipelago to the edge of the open sea Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Kaartokallio++2006 Serial 744  
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Author Underwood, G.J.C.; Aslam, S.N.; Michel, C.; Niemi, A.; Norman, L.; Meiners, K.M.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Paterson, H.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Broad-scale predictability of carbohydrates and exopolymers in Antarctic and Arctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 110 Issue 39 Pages 15734-15739  
  Keywords Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; Biopolymers/*analysis; Carbohydrates/*analysis; Ice Cover/*chemistry; Models, Chemical; Molecular Weight; Solubility; algae; biogeochemistry; global relationships; microbial  
  Abstract Sea ice can contain high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), much of which is carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microalgae and bacteria inhabiting the ice. Here we report the concentrations of dissolved carbohydrates (dCHO) and dissolved EPS (dEPS) in relation to algal standing stock [estimated by chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations] in sea ice from six locations in the Southern and Arctic Oceans. Concentrations varied substantially within and between sampling sites, reflecting local ice conditions and biological content. However, combining all data revealed robust statistical relationships between dCHO concentrations and the concentrations of different dEPS fractions, Chl a, and DOC. These relationships were true for whole ice cores, bottom ice (biomass rich) sections, and colder surface ice. The distribution of dEPS was strongly correlated to algal biomass, with the highest concentrations of both dEPS and non-EPS carbohydrates in the bottom horizons of the ice. Complex EPS was more prevalent in colder surface sea ice horizons. Predictive models (validated against independent data) were derived to enable the estimation of dCHO concentrations from data on ice thickness, salinity, and vertical position in core. When Chl a data were included a higher level of prediction was obtained. The consistent patterns reflected in these relationships provide a strong basis for including estimates of regional and seasonal carbohydrate and dEPS carbon budgets in coupled physical-biogeochemical models, across different types of sea ice from both polar regions.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher National Academy of Sciences Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24019487; PMCID:PMC3785782 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 17491  
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Author Stedmon, C.A.; Thomas, D.N.; Granskog, M.; Kaartokallio, H.; Papadimitriou, S.; Kuosa, H. url  openurl
  Title (up) Characteristics of dissolved organic matter in Baltic coastal sea ice: allochthonous or autochthonous origins? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Environmental Science & Technology Abbreviated Journal Environ Sci Technol  
  Volume 41 Issue 21 Pages 7273-7279  
  Keywords Carbon/analysis; *Humic Substances; Ice Cover/*chemistry; Nitrogen/analysis; Oceans and Seas; Spectrometry, Fluorescence  
  Abstract The origin of dissolved organic matter (DOM) within sea ice in coastal waters of the Baltic Sea was investigated using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis of DOM fluorescence. Sea ice DOM had distinctly different fluorescence characteristics than that of the underlying humic-rich waters and was dominated by protein-like fluorescence signals. PARAFAC analysis identified five fluorescent components, all of which were present in both sea ice and water. Three humic components were negatively correlated to salinity and concluded to be terrestrially derived material. Baltic Sea ice DOM was found to be a mixture of humic material from the underlying water column incorporated during ice formation and autochthonous material produced by organisms within the ice. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations were correlated to the humic fluorescence, indicating that the majority of the organic carbon and nitrogen in Baltic Sea ice is bound in terrestrial humic material trapped within the ice. This has implications for our understanding of sea ice carbon cycling in regions influenced by riverine input (e.g., Baltic and Arctic coastal waters), as the susceptibility of DOM to degradation and remineralization is largely determined by its source.  
  Address Department of Marine Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. cst@dmu.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-936X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18044499 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12979  
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Author Granskog, M.A.; Virkkunen, K.; Thomas, D.N.; Ehn, J.; Kola, H.; Martma, T. url  openurl
  Title (up) Chemical properties of brackish water ice in the Bothnian Bay, the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal J Glaciol  
  Volume 50 Issue 169 Pages 292-302  
  Keywords Dependent Solute Redistribution; Dissolved Organic Matter; Phase Boundary; Sulfate; Binding; Summer; Oxygen; Core; Gulf  
  Abstract The behavior of majors, δ18O, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trace elements was studied during the initial freezing of low-saline water (3 practical salinity units) in a freezing experiment. Samples were also collected from first-year sea ice from pack ice in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. During initial ice formation, the major-ion ratios in sea ice indicated variable behavior, with some ions showing relative enrichment (sulfate, calcium and magnesium), conservative behavior (sodium) or relative depletion (potassium) compared to sea water at the same salinity DOC, iron and aluminum showed enrichment in the ice, while zinc was depleted to salinity. Lead was detected in surface snow-ice layers only, implying atmospheric accumulation. First-year sea ice, with a variable growth and thermal history, showed behavior for major ions similar to that observed in new ice. However, for trace elements the picture was much more complicated, most likely due to active secondary processes such as atmospheric supply and biological activity. Ice growth has a potential impact on the chemical budgets and cycling of some elements, especially those which are selectively rejected/retained during sea-ice formation, particularly in the shallow parts of the Bothnian Bay covered with a land-fast ice cover.  
  Address Granskog: Univ Helsinki, Dept Phys Sci, Div Geophys, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Bothnian Bay Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000227720900014 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2004 Serial 741  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title (up) Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 81-91  
  Keywords dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
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