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Author Weykam, G.; Thomas, D.N.; Wiencke, C. openurl 
  Title (up) Growth and photosynthesis of the Antarctic red algae Palmaria decipiens (Palmariales) and Iridaea cordata (Gigartinales) during and following extended periods of darkness Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Phycologia Abbreviated Journal Phycologia  
  Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 395-405  
  Keywords Winter; Polar waters; Photosynthesis; Antarctic zone; Ice cover; Seaweeds; Light effects; Plant physiology; Growth; Palmariales; Gigartinales; Iridaea cordata; Palmaria decipiens; Ps; Antarctica  
  Abstract Physiological and developmental responses during and following long-term exposure to darkness were investigated in the Antarctic red algae Palmaria decipiens and Iridaea cordata. Thalli were kept in darkness for a period of 6 mo, simulating winter sea ice cover. Subsequently, they were grown illuminated under seasonally fluctuating Antarctic daylengths. During darkness, P. decipiens, an Antarctic endemic, rapidly lost its ability to photosynthesize although chlorophyll a content remained fairly constant. The amount of floridean starch decreased gradually in the dark, with a sudden drop simultaneous with the development of new blades. After reexposure to light there was a rapid increase in photosynthetic oxygen production, whereas the rate of carbon assimilation increased more slowly, resulting in high apparent photosynthetic quotients. The increase in growth rate showed a close relation to carbon assimilation, suggesting that carbon is utilized first for growth, then for floridean starch accumulation. In contrast to P. decipiens, the photosynthetic rate of the Antarctic cold-temperate I. cordata was still about half of the initial rate after a dark period of 6 mo, i.e. the alga maintained functionality of its photosynthetic apparatus during winter. After reexposure to light there was a continuous increase in specific growth rate due to increasing photosynthetic activity. Iridaea cordata also accumulated floridean starch during summer, although in smaller amounts than P. decipiens. Together with the ability to photosynthesize, starch accumulation facilitates survival during extended dark periods in winter. The early development of blade initials and the rapid increase in photosynthetic capability after illumination may permit P. decipiens to use the period of high water transparency optimally in Antarctic spring. Iridaea cordata seems better able to survive prolonged dark periods in areas with less predictable light conditions. Both physiological patterns are well suited to the highly seasonal light conditions in Antarctica.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-8884 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Weykam++1997 Serial 767  
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Author Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Thomas, D.N.; Kuosa, H. url  openurl
  Title (up) Influence of freshwater inflow on the inorganic nutrient and dissolved organic matter within coastal sea ice and underlying waters in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science Abbreviated Journal Estuar Coast Shelf Sci  
  Volume 65 Issue 1-2 Pages 109-122  
  Keywords coastal oceanography; sea ice; river plumes; estuarine chemistry; nutrients (mineral); dissolved organic matter; Baltic Sea  
  Abstract A study was conducted to measure the biogeochemical characteristics of freshwater plumes underlying Baltic Sea land-fast ice, and the overlying sea ice. A 40-km long transect was conducted in the northern Baltic Sea in March 2003, following a freshwater plume from its source into the fully mixed open-sea area. The spreading of river outflow below the ice resulted in a well-stratified low-salinity surface layer further out than normally occurs in the open-water period. The freshwaters were high in dissolved organic matter (DOC, DON and CDOM), and inorganic nutrients (ammonium, nitrate and silicate), although the levels of phosphate were low. In general these parameters changed concurrently with salinity in such a way that mixing was conservative. The characteristics of the ice varied from the freshwater source to the open water, with increasing salinity and brine volumes (porosity) occurring in the more open-sea stations. Coinciding with the changes in ice properties there was an increase in sea-ice algal growth in the more marine stations along the transect. Biological activity in the ice was largely confined to bottom ice assemblages. In contrast to the conditions in the underlying water, no relationship between salinity, inorganic nutrients and organic matter was observed in the ice. In particular ammonium, phosphate, DOC and DON were present in excess of those levels predicted from the dilution curves, indicating the presence of considerable DOM production by ice assemblages, inorganic nutrient uptake and remineralization within the ice.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication San Diego Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Sampling: Nine stations along a 40km salinity gradient from inner Pojo Bay through the Archipelago to the edge of the open sea Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2005_2 Serial 740  
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Author Arrigo, K.R.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title (up) Large scale importance of sea ice biology in the Southern Ocean Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 471-486  
  Keywords algae; Antarctic; biogeochemistry; carbon cycle; primary production; Full Data Records  
  Abstract Despite being one of the largest biomes on earth, sea ice ecosystems have only received intensive study over the past 30 years. Sea ice is a unique habitat for assemblages of bacteria, algae, protists, and invertebrates that grow within a matrix dominated by strong gradients in temperature, salinity, nutrients, and UV and visible radiation. A suite of physiological adaptations allow these organisms to thrive in ice, where their enormous biomass makes them a fundamental component of polar ecosystems. Sea ice algae are an important energy and nutritional source for invertebrates such as juvenile krill, accounting for up to 25% of total annual primary production in ice-covered waters. The ability of ice algae to produce large amounts of UV absorbing compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids makes them even more important to organisms like krill that can incorporate these sunscreens into their own tissues. Furthermore, the nutrient and light conditions in which sea ice algae thrive induce them to synthesize enhanced concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, a vital constituent of the diet of grazing organisms, especially during winter. Finally, sea ice bacteria and algae have become the focus of biotechnology, and are being considered as proxies of possible life forms on ice-covered extraterrestrial systems. An analysis of how the balance between sea ice and pelagic production might change under a warming scenario indicates that when current levels of primary production and changes in the areas of sea ice habitats are taken into account, the expected 25% loss of sea ice over the next century would increase primary production in the Southern Ocean by approximately 10%, resulting in a slight negative feedback on climate warming.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Arrigo+Thomas2004 Serial 729  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Mock, T. url  openurl
  Title (up) Life in frozen veins – coping with the cold Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication The Biochemist Abbreviated Journal Biochemist  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 12-16  
  Keywords adaptation; Antarctic; Arctic; low temperature; micro-organism; sea ice  
  Abstract Every autumn a fundamental transition occurs in the surface waters of Polar Oceans. The surface waters of millions of square kilometres freeze to form an ice layer that varies from a few centimetres through to several metres thick, and which effectively separates the ocean from the atmosphere above. Ice made from seawater is a porous, semi-solid matrix permeated by a labyrinth of brine channels and pores, and within these a diverse microbial assemblage, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, flagellates and unicellular algae can thrive. These assemblages can reach such high abundances that the ice becomes a rich coffee colour. The microbial assemblages are in turn a rich food source for grazing proto- and zooplankton, especially in winter when food in the water column is scarce.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Biochemical Society Place of Publication London Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Mock2005 Serial 765  
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Author Gomez, I.; Thomas, D.N.; Wiencke, C. openurl 
  Title (up) Longitudinal profiles of growth, photosynthesis and light independent carbon fixation in the Antarctic brown alga Ascoseira mirabilis Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Botanica Marina Abbreviated Journal Bot Mar  
  Volume 38 Issue Pages 157-164  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Thallus growth, photoynthetic oxygen evolution and rates of carbon fixation were determinedalong the lamina of the endemic Antarctic brown alga Ascoseira mirabilis (Ascoseirales), grown under simulated Antarctic condtions. The meristem is basally located and forms new blade tiddue under spring-conditions. Light saturated net photosynthesis (P,ax), measures as O? production, was higher in ther intermediate region of the plant (9..8 µmol O? g?¹ fw h?¹). In general, photosynthetic parameters such as dark respiration, gross photosynthesis, photosynthetic efficiency (?) and photosynthetic light compensation (Ic) increased significantly towards the distal region. Carbon-fixation in A. mirabilis also showed thllus-dependent variation. Rates of light and light independent (dark) carbon fixation increased towards the distal regions ranging between 7.6-9.5 and 1.2-2.0 µmol C g?¹ fw h?¹ respectively. The percentage of light independent carbon fixation (in relation to light ¹?C-fixation) also increased from the basal to the distal parts reaching 24% in the distal region of the thallus. he contents of Chl a and Chl c, were close to 0.37 and 0.14 mg g?¹ fw respectively and were notably uniform along the lamina. The results indicate that the formation of the blade by a basal meristem and the increase of light carbon fixation rates from base to the distal regions in A. mirabilis are similar compared with certain Laminariales, especially members of the genus Laminaria. However, light independent carbon fixation is highest in the meristem of Laminaria, opposite to the results obtained here for A. mirabilis  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher de Gruyter Place of Publication Berlin, New York Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gomez++1995 Serial 736  
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