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Author Brierley, A.S.; Thomas, D.N. openurl 
  Title (up) Ecology of southern ocean pack ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Advances in marine biology Abbreviated Journal Adv Mar Biol  
  Volume 43 Issue Pages 171-276  
  Keywords Animals; Antarctic Regions; Birds; Crustacea; Ecology; *Ecosystem; Environment; Fishes; *Ice; *Marine Biology; Oceans and Seas; Phytoplankton; Population Dynamics; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Seasons; *Seawater; Water Microbiology; Whales  
  Abstract Around Antarctica the annual five-fold growth and decay of sea ice is the most prominent physical process and has a profound impact on marine life there. In winter the pack ice canopy extends to cover almost 20 million square kilometres--some 8% of the southern hemisphere and an area larger than the Antarctic continent itself (13.2 million square kilometres)--and is one of the largest, most dynamic ecosystems on earth. Biological activity is associated with all physical components of the sea-ice system: the sea-ice surface; the internal sea-ice matrix and brine channel system; the underside of sea ice and the waters in the vicinity of sea ice that are modified by the presence of sea ice. Microbial and microalgal communities proliferate on and within sea ice and are grazed by a wide range of proto- and macrozooplankton that inhabit the sea ice in large concentrations. Grazing organisms also exploit biogenic material released from the sea ice at ice break-up or melt. Although rates of primary production in the underlying water column are often low because of shading by sea-ice cover, sea ice itself forms a substratum that provides standing stocks of bacteria, algae and grazers significantly higher than those in ice-free areas. Decay of sea ice in summer releases particulate and dissolved organic matter to the water column, playing a major role in biogeochemical cycling as well as seeding water column phytoplankton blooms. Numerous zooplankton species graze sea-ice algae, benefiting additionally because the overlying sea-ice ceiling provides a refuge from surface predators. Sea ice is an important nursery habitat for Antarctic krill, the pivotal species in the Southern Ocean marine ecosystem. Some deep-water fish migrate to shallow depths beneath sea ice to exploit the elevated concentrations of some zooplankton there. The increased secondary production associated with pack ice and the sea-ice edge is exploited by many higher predators, with seals, seabirds and whales aggregating there. As a result, much of the Southern Ocean pelagic whaling was concentrated at the edge of the marginal ice zone. The extent and duration of sea ice fluctuate periodically under the influence of global climatic phenomena including the El Nino Southern Oscillation. Life cycles of some associated species may reflect this periodicity. With evidence for climatic warming in some regions of Antarctica, there is concern that ecosystem change may be induced by changes in sea-ice extent. The relative abundance of krill and salps appears to change interannually with sea-ice extent, and in warm years, when salps proliferate, krill are scarce and dependent predators suffer severely. Further research on the Southern Ocean sea-ice system is required, not only to further our basic understanding of the ecology, but also to provide ecosystem managers with the information necessary for the development of strategies in response to short- and medium-term environmental changes in Antarctica. Technological advances are delivering new sampling platforms such as autonomous underwater vehicles that are improving vastly our ability to sample the Antarctic under sea-ice environment. Data from such platforms will enhance greatly our understanding of the globally important Southern Ocean sea-ice ecosystem.  
  Address Gatty Marine Laboratory, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK. andrew.brierley@st-andrews.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0065-2881 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12154613 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Baumann, M.E.M.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title (up) Efficiency of carbon assimilation and photoacclimation in a small unicellular Chaetoceros species from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica): Influence of temperature and irradiance Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Mar Biol Ecol  
  Volume 157 Issue 2 Pages 195-209  
  Keywords photosynthesis; Psw; Weddell Sea; Chaetoceros; temperature effects; irradiance; light effects; acclimation; respiration; carbon fixation; low temperature; polar waters; Antarctica; water temperature  
  Abstract It is well established that Antarctic phytoplankton and sea-ice algae are able to thrive at low temperatures and it has been proposed that a reduction in respiration may be important in enabling them to do this. This possibility was studied in an Antarctic clone of a small unicellular Chaetoceros species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica), using comparative measurements of C assimilation during long- and short-term incubation series over a range of temperatures (-1.5 to 4 °C) at two irradiances (5 and 55 µmol m?²/s). Even though doubling times varied considerably, the total amount of C assimilated per cell per generation time was similar at each of the temperature and light conditions. However, over one cell cycle, significant respiratory C losses were determined by divergences in C assimilation patterns between cumulative and long-term incubations at both light intensities at 0 and 4 °C. At -1.5 °C, insignificant C losses were recorded. No significant extracellular release of dissolved organic material (DOC) was observed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1992 Serial 757  
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Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Energy efficiency of an outdoor microalgal photobioreactor sited at mid-temperate latitude Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 12 Pages 6687-6695  
  Keywords Biomass; *Bioreactors; Climate; Geography; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Oxygen/metabolism; Scenedesmus/growth & development/*metabolism; Seasons; Solar Energy  
  Abstract This work examined the energetic performance of a 6-month semi-continuous cultivation of Scenedesmus obliquus in an outdoor photobioreactor at mid-temperate latitude, without temperature control. By measuring the seasonal biomass production (mean 11.31, range 1.39-23.67 g m(-2)d(-1)), higher heating value (22.94 kJ g(-1)) and solar irradiance, the mean seasonally-averaged photosynthetic efficiency (2.18%) and gross energy productivity (0.27 MJ m(-2) d(-1)) was calculated. When comparing the solar energy conversion efficiency to the energy investment for culture circulation, significant improvements in reactor energy input must be made to make the system viable. Using the data collected to model the energetic performance of a substitute photobioreactor design, we conclude that sustainable photobioreactor cultivation of microalgae in similar temperate climates requires a short light path and low power input, only reasonably obtained by flat-panel systems. However, temperature control was not necessary for effective long-term cultivation.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21511466 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12984  
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Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Wakeman, K.D.; Thomas, D.N.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 124 Issue Pages 387-393  
  Keywords Bacteria/classification/genetics/metabolism; *Biomass; Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel; Eukaryotic Cells; Microalgae/*metabolism; Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Prokaryotic Cells  
  Abstract Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22995170 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12987  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title (up) Frozen Oceans – The floating world of pack ice Type Book Whole
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Pack ice is a layer of frozen seawater on the top of the polar oceans, varying in thickness from a few centimetres to tens of metres. It is an ephemeral feature, not just of polar regions but also of seas such as the Baltic, Caspian and Sea of Okhotsk. At its maximum extent it covers 13% of the Earth's surface area, making it one of the major biomes on the planet.For many years seen as an obstacle to trade and a threat to human life, the ice itself is now perceived to be vulnerable as we come to realize the dangers posed by global warming. Sea ice not only dominates polar regions but is also central to global ocean circulation as well as global climate patterns. Every year the formation, consolidation and subsequent melt of millions of square kilometres of ice influence the whole of the ocean's ecosystems.This is the first book to offer the general reader access to a remote frozen habitat which has for so long fascinated explorers, writers and scientists. During the harsh polar winter the surface of the ocean freezes up, forming a temporary ice layer called pack ice, or sea ice. This gives rise to a spectacular floating world which for a number of months each year becomes home to a wealth of plant and animal life. The wonderful colour photographs of life on, in and under the ice help draw the reader into this superb account of an extreme environment. Guaranteed to capture the imagination.The author is a veteran of six expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and this book is packed with photographs taken in the course of his journeys. His lively and readable text conveys his excitement at the dangers and possibilities of life on the ice. He provides an in-depth background to the whole ecosystem of sea ice, its living communities and the structure of the ice itself. The level of accurate scientific detail will satisfy anyone looking for a reliable, up-to-date overview of this topic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Natural History Museum Place of Publication London Editor Coyne, C.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-565-09188-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2004 Serial 756  
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