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Author Schnack-Schiel, S.B.; Thomas, D.N.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Alheit, R. url  openurl
  Title The occurrence of the copepods Stephos longipes (Calanoida) and Drescheriella glacialis (Harpacticoida) in summer sea ice in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarctic Sci  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 150-157  
  Keywords copepods; Drescheriella glacialis; sea ice; seasonality; Stephos longipes  
  Abstract In January to March 1997, a RV Polarstern cruise that transected the Weddell Sea resulted in samples being taken in thick pack ice in the south-eastern Weddell Sea and then along the marginal ice edge towards the Antarctic Peninsula. Several ice types were thus sampled over a wide geographic area during late summer/early autumn. Common features of the first warm period was the occurrence of surface ponds, and that many floes had quasi-continuous horizontal gaps, underlying a layer of ice and metamorphic snow. With the onset of cold air temperatures in late February the gaps rapidly refroze. The calanoid copepod Stephos longipes occurred in all habitats encountered and showed highest numbers in the surface ice in summer, in the gap water during both seasons and in the refrozen gap water in autumn. Nauplii outnumbered copepodids in the surface ice and refrozen gap water, while in the gap water copepodids, mainly stages CI-CIII in summer and CII-CIV in autumn, comprised about 70% of the total population. The harpacticoid species Drescheriella glacialis did not occur in all habitats and was missing in surface ponds and new ice. Nauplii of D. glacialis were rarely found in gapwater, but predominated in the refrozen gaps.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis (up)  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Schnack-Schiel++2001_2 Serial 753  
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Author Steffens, M.; Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Luodekari, K.; Papadimitriou, S.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Spatial variation of biogeochemical properties of landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea Type Conference Article
  Year 2006 Publication Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal Ann Glaciol  
  Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 80-87  
  Keywords Sea ice; Fast ice; Sea ice properties; Ice algae; Chlorophyll; Biogeochemistry; Nutrients (mineral); Particulate organic matter; Dissolved organic matter; Salinity; Spatial scale; Spatial variability; Horizontal patchiness; Sampling design; Brackish water; Ane; Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia  
  Abstract Horizontal variation of landfast sea-ice properties was studied in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea, during March 2004. In order to estimate their variability among and within different spatial levels, 72 ice cores were sampled on five spatial scales (with spacings of 10 cm, 2.5 m, 25 m, 250 m and 2.5 km) using a hierarchical sampling design. Entire cores were melted, and bulk-ice salinity, concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), phaeophytin (Phaeo), dissolved nitrate plus nitrite (DIN) as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were determined. All sampling sites were covered by a 5.5-23 cm thick layer of snow. Ice thicknesses of cores varied from 26 to 58 cm, with bulk-ice salinities ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 as is typical for Baltic Sea ice. Observed values for Chl a (range: 0.8-6.0 μg Chl a l-1; median: 2.9 μg Chl a l -1) and DOC (range: 37-397 μM; median: 95 μM) were comparable to values reported by previous sea-ice studies from the Baltic Sea. Analysis of variance among different spatial levels revealed significant differences on the 2.5 km scale for ice thickness, DOC and Phaeo (with the latter two being positively correlated with ice thickness). For salinity and Chl a, the 250 m scale was found to be the largest scale where significant differences could be detected, while snow depth only varied significantly on the 25 m scale. Variability on the 2.5 m scale contributed significantly to the total variation for ice thickness, salinity, Chl a and DIN. In the case of DON, none of the investigated levels exhibited variation that was significantly different from the considerable amount of variation found between replicate cores. Results from a principal component analysis suggest that ice thickness is one of the main elements structuring the investigated ice habitat on a large scale, while snow depth, nutrients and salinity seem to be of secondary importance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis (up)  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0260-3055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia Expedition Conference International Symposium on Sea Ice, Dunedin (New Zealand), 5-9 Dec 2005  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Steffens++2006 Serial 754  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photosynthetic microbes in freezing deserts Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Trends in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Trends Microbiol  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 87-88  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Polar deserts are not devoid of life despite the extreme low temperature and scarcity of water. Recently, patterned stone fields – caused by periglacial activity – have been surveyed in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was found that the productivity of the cyanobacteria and algae (hypoliths) that colonise the underside of the stones is strongly related to the pattern of the stones. The hypolith assemblages were in some cases as productive as lichens, bryophytes and plants that resided nearby.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis (up)  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0966-842X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2005 Serial 755  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Frozen Oceans – The floating world of pack ice Type Book Whole
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Pack ice is a layer of frozen seawater on the top of the polar oceans, varying in thickness from a few centimetres to tens of metres. It is an ephemeral feature, not just of polar regions but also of seas such as the Baltic, Caspian and Sea of Okhotsk. At its maximum extent it covers 13% of the Earth's surface area, making it one of the major biomes on the planet.For many years seen as an obstacle to trade and a threat to human life, the ice itself is now perceived to be vulnerable as we come to realize the dangers posed by global warming. Sea ice not only dominates polar regions but is also central to global ocean circulation as well as global climate patterns. Every year the formation, consolidation and subsequent melt of millions of square kilometres of ice influence the whole of the ocean's ecosystems.This is the first book to offer the general reader access to a remote frozen habitat which has for so long fascinated explorers, writers and scientists. During the harsh polar winter the surface of the ocean freezes up, forming a temporary ice layer called pack ice, or sea ice. This gives rise to a spectacular floating world which for a number of months each year becomes home to a wealth of plant and animal life. The wonderful colour photographs of life on, in and under the ice help draw the reader into this superb account of an extreme environment. Guaranteed to capture the imagination.The author is a veteran of six expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and this book is packed with photographs taken in the course of his journeys. His lively and readable text conveys his excitement at the dangers and possibilities of life on the ice. He provides an in-depth background to the whole ecosystem of sea ice, its living communities and the structure of the ice itself. The level of accurate scientific detail will satisfy anyone looking for a reliable, up-to-date overview of this topic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis (up)  
  Publisher Natural History Museum Place of Publication London Editor Coyne, C.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-565-09188-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2004 Serial 756  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Baumann, M.E.M.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title Efficiency of carbon assimilation and photoacclimation in a small unicellular Chaetoceros species from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica): Influence of temperature and irradiance Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Mar Biol Ecol  
  Volume 157 Issue 2 Pages 195-209  
  Keywords photosynthesis; Psw; Weddell Sea; Chaetoceros; temperature effects; irradiance; light effects; acclimation; respiration; carbon fixation; low temperature; polar waters; Antarctica; water temperature  
  Abstract It is well established that Antarctic phytoplankton and sea-ice algae are able to thrive at low temperatures and it has been proposed that a reduction in respiration may be important in enabling them to do this. This possibility was studied in an Antarctic clone of a small unicellular Chaetoceros species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica), using comparative measurements of C assimilation during long- and short-term incubation series over a range of temperatures (-1.5 to 4 °C) at two irradiances (5 and 55 µmol m?²/s). Even though doubling times varied considerably, the total amount of C assimilated per cell per generation time was similar at each of the temperature and light conditions. However, over one cell cycle, significant respiratory C losses were determined by divergences in C assimilation patterns between cumulative and long-term incubations at both light intensities at 0 and 4 °C. At -1.5 °C, insignificant C losses were recorded. No significant extracellular release of dissolved organic material (DOC) was observed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis (up)  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1992 Serial 757  
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