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Author Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photosynthetic microbes in freezing deserts Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication (down) Trends in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Trends Microbiol  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 87-88  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Polar deserts are not devoid of life despite the extreme low temperature and scarcity of water. Recently, patterned stone fields – caused by periglacial activity – have been surveyed in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was found that the productivity of the cyanobacteria and algae (hypoliths) that colonise the underside of the stones is strongly related to the pattern of the stones. The hypolith assemblages were in some cases as productive as lichens, bryophytes and plants that resided nearby.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0966-842X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2005 Serial 755  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Raike, A.; Kortelainen, P.; Mattsson, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title 36 year trends in dissolved organic carbon export from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 435-436 Issue Pages 188-201  
  Keywords Baltic States; Carbon/*chemistry; Finland; Hydrology; Oceans and Seas; Rivers/*chemistry; Seasons; Soil/chemistry  
  Abstract Increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in lakes, rivers and streams in northern mid latitudes have been widely reported during the last two decades, but relatively few studies have dealt with trends in DOC export. We studied the export of DOC from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea between 1975 and 2010, and estimated trends in DOC fluxes (both flow normalised and non-normalised). The study encompassed the whole Finnish Baltic Sea catchment area (301,000 km(2)) covering major land use patterns in the boreal zone. Finnish rivers exported annually over 900,000 t DOC to the Baltic Sea, and the mean area specific export was 3.5 t km(-2). The highest export (7.3t km(-2)) was measured in peat dominated catchments, whereas catchments rich in lakes had the lowest export (2.2 t km(-2)). Inter-annual variation in DOC export was high and controlled mainly by hydrology. There was no overall trend in the annual water flow, although winter flow increased in northern Finland over 36 years. Despite the numerous studies showing increases in DOC concentrations in streams and rivers in the northern hemisphere, we could not find any evidence of increases in DOC export to the northern Baltic Sea from Finnish catchments since 1975.  
  Address Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), P.O. Box 140, FI-00251, Helsinki, Finland. antti.raike@ymparisto.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22854090 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12986  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Mock, T. url  openurl
  Title Life in frozen veins – coping with the cold Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication (down) The Biochemist Abbreviated Journal Biochemist  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 12-16  
  Keywords adaptation; Antarctic; Arctic; low temperature; micro-organism; sea ice  
  Abstract Every autumn a fundamental transition occurs in the surface waters of Polar Oceans. The surface waters of millions of square kilometres freeze to form an ice layer that varies from a few centimetres through to several metres thick, and which effectively separates the ocean from the atmosphere above. Ice made from seawater is a porous, semi-solid matrix permeated by a labyrinth of brine channels and pores, and within these a diverse microbial assemblage, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, flagellates and unicellular algae can thrive. These assemblages can reach such high abundances that the ice becomes a rich coffee colour. The microbial assemblages are in turn a rich food source for grazing proto- and zooplankton, especially in winter when food in the water column is scarce.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Biochemical Society Place of Publication London Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Mock2005 Serial 765  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Papadimitriou, S. isbn  openurl
  Title Biogeochemistry of sea ice Type Book Chapter
  Year 2003 Publication (down) Sea ice – an introduction to its physics, chemistry, biology and geology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 267-302  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Oxford Editor Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-632-05808-0 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Papadimitriou2003 Serial 766  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Antarctic sea ice – a habitat for extremophiles Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication (down) Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 295 Issue 5555 Pages 641-644  
  Keywords Microorganisms; Sea ice; Ecosystems; Polar zones; Antarctic zone; Epontic organisms; Sea ice ecology; Antarctic sea ice; Marine microorganisms; Marine ecosystems; Bacteria; Algae; Psychrophilic bacteria; extremophiles; Ps; Antarctica  
  Abstract The pack ice of Earth's polar oceans appears to be frozen white desert, devoid of life. However, beneath the snow lies a unique habitat for a group of bacteria and microscopic plants and animals that are encased in an ice matrix at low temperatures and light levels, with the only liquid being pockets of concentrated brines. Survival in these conditions requires a complex suite of physiological and metabolic adaptations, but sea-ice organisms thrive in the ice, and their prolific growth ensures they play a fundamental role in polar ecosystems. Apart from their ecological importance, the bacterial and algae species found in sea ice have become the focus for novel biotechnology, as well as being considered proxies for possible life forms on ice- covered extraterrestrial bodies.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Dieckmann2002_2 Serial 759  
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