toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
  Records Links
Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Energy efficiency of an outdoor microalgal photobioreactor sited at mid-temperate latitude Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 12 Pages 6687-6695  
  Keywords Biomass; *Bioreactors; Climate; Geography; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Oxygen/metabolism; Scenedesmus/growth & development/*metabolism; Seasons; Solar Energy  
  Abstract This work examined the energetic performance of a 6-month semi-continuous cultivation of Scenedesmus obliquus in an outdoor photobioreactor at mid-temperate latitude, without temperature control. By measuring the seasonal biomass production (mean 11.31, range 1.39-23.67 g m(-2)d(-1)), higher heating value (22.94 kJ g(-1)) and solar irradiance, the mean seasonally-averaged photosynthetic efficiency (2.18%) and gross energy productivity (0.27 MJ m(-2) d(-1)) was calculated. When comparing the solar energy conversion efficiency to the energy investment for culture circulation, significant improvements in reactor energy input must be made to make the system viable. Using the data collected to model the energetic performance of a substitute photobioreactor design, we conclude that sustainable photobioreactor cultivation of microalgae in similar temperate climates requires a short light path and low power input, only reasonably obtained by flat-panel systems. However, temperature control was not necessary for effective long-term cultivation.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21511466 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12984  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biogenic hydrogen and methane production from Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta biomass Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biotechnology for Biofuels Abbreviated Journal Biotechnol Biofuels  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 34  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuel and bioenergy production due to their high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates and no need for external organic carbon supply. In this study, utilization of Chlorella vulgaris (a fresh water microalga) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (a marine microalga) biomass was tested as a feedstock for anaerobic H2 and CH4 production. RESULTS: Anaerobic serum bottle assays were conducted at 37 degrees C with enrichment cultures derived from municipal anaerobic digester sludge. Low levels of H2 were produced by anaerobic enrichment cultures, but H2 was subsequently consumed even in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogens. Without inoculation, algal biomass still produced H2 due to the activities of satellite bacteria associated with algal cultures. CH4 was produced from both types of biomass with anaerobic enrichments. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling indicated the presence of H2-producing and H2-consuming bacteria in the anaerobic enrichment cultures and the presence of H2-producing bacteria among the satellite bacteria in both sources of algal biomass. CONCLUSIONS: H2 production by the satellite bacteria was comparable from D. tertiolecta (12.6 ml H2/g volatile solids (VS)) and from C. vulgaris (10.8 ml H2/g VS), whereas CH4 production was significantly higher from C. vulgaris (286 ml/g VS) than from D. tertiolecta (24 ml/g VS). The high salinity of the D. tertiolecta slurry, prohibitive to methanogens, was the probable reason for lower CH4 production.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1754-6834 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21943287; PMCID:PMC3193024 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12985  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Raike, A.; Kortelainen, P.; Mattsson, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title 36 year trends in dissolved organic carbon export from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 435-436 Issue Pages 188-201  
  Keywords Baltic States; Carbon/*chemistry; Finland; Hydrology; Oceans and Seas; Rivers/*chemistry; Seasons; Soil/chemistry  
  Abstract Increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in lakes, rivers and streams in northern mid latitudes have been widely reported during the last two decades, but relatively few studies have dealt with trends in DOC export. We studied the export of DOC from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea between 1975 and 2010, and estimated trends in DOC fluxes (both flow normalised and non-normalised). The study encompassed the whole Finnish Baltic Sea catchment area (301,000 km(2)) covering major land use patterns in the boreal zone. Finnish rivers exported annually over 900,000 t DOC to the Baltic Sea, and the mean area specific export was 3.5 t km(-2). The highest export (7.3t km(-2)) was measured in peat dominated catchments, whereas catchments rich in lakes had the lowest export (2.2 t km(-2)). Inter-annual variation in DOC export was high and controlled mainly by hydrology. There was no overall trend in the annual water flow, although winter flow increased in northern Finland over 36 years. Despite the numerous studies showing increases in DOC concentrations in streams and rivers in the northern hemisphere, we could not find any evidence of increases in DOC export to the northern Baltic Sea from Finnish catchments since 1975.  
  Address Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), P.O. Box 140, FI-00251, Helsinki, Finland. antti.raike@ymparisto.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22854090 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12986  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Wakeman, K.D.; Thomas, D.N.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 124 Issue Pages 387-393  
  Keywords Bacteria/classification/genetics/metabolism; *Biomass; Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel; Eukaryotic Cells; Microalgae/*metabolism; Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Prokaryotic Cells  
  Abstract Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22995170 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12987  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 81-91  
  Keywords dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication (up) Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details

Save Citations:
Export Records: