toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
  Records Links
Author Granskog, M.A.; Virkkunen, K.; Thomas, D.N.; Ehn, J.; Kola, H.; Martma, T. url  openurl
  Title Chemical properties of brackish water ice in the Bothnian Bay, the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal J Glaciol  
  Volume 50 Issue 169 Pages 292-302  
  Keywords (up) Dependent Solute Redistribution; Dissolved Organic Matter; Phase Boundary; Sulfate; Binding; Summer; Oxygen; Core; Gulf  
  Abstract The behavior of majors, δ18O, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trace elements was studied during the initial freezing of low-saline water (3 practical salinity units) in a freezing experiment. Samples were also collected from first-year sea ice from pack ice in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. During initial ice formation, the major-ion ratios in sea ice indicated variable behavior, with some ions showing relative enrichment (sulfate, calcium and magnesium), conservative behavior (sodium) or relative depletion (potassium) compared to sea water at the same salinity DOC, iron and aluminum showed enrichment in the ice, while zinc was depleted to salinity. Lead was detected in surface snow-ice layers only, implying atmospheric accumulation. First-year sea ice, with a variable growth and thermal history, showed behavior for major ions similar to that observed in new ice. However, for trace elements the picture was much more complicated, most likely due to active secondary processes such as atmospheric supply and biological activity. Ice growth has a potential impact on the chemical budgets and cycling of some elements, especially those which are selectively rejected/retained during sea-ice formation, particularly in the shallow parts of the Bothnian Bay covered with a land-fast ice cover.  
  Address Granskog: Univ Helsinki, Dept Phys Sci, Div Geophys, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Bothnian Bay Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000227720900014 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2004 Serial 741  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 81-91  
  Keywords (up) dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Herborg, L.-M.; Thomas, D.N.; Kennedy, H.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Dissolved carbohydrates in Antarctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 119-125  
  Keywords (up) Doc; Mcho; Pcho; sea ice; bacteria; carbon cycling; diatoms; dissolved organic carbon; monocarbohydrates; polycarbohydrates  
  Abstract Concentrations of dissolved monocarbohydrates (MCHO) and polycarbohydrates (PCHO) were analysed in a variety of ice habitats from summer Weddell Sea sea ice (surface ponds, ice cores, gap layers and platelet ice). The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in these habitats was also measured and the contribution of carbohydrate to this pool was assessed. The DOC concentrations within all sea ice habitats were high compared to surface seawater concentrations with values up to 958µMC being measured. Total carbohydrates (TCHO) were highest in the ice cores and platelet ice samples, up to 3 1% of the DOC pool, a reflection of the high algal biomass in these two habitat classes. TCHO in the other habitats ranged between 10% and 29% of DOC. The ratios of MCHO to PCHO varied considerably between the ice habitats: in surface ponds and ice cores MCHO was 70% of the TCHO pool, whereas in gap layers and platelet ice there were lower PCHO concentrations resulting in MCHO being 88% of TCHO.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Herborg++2001 Serial 743  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Lara, R.J.; Haas, C.; Schnack-Schiel, S.B.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Kattner, G.; Nöthig, E.-M.; Mizdalski, E. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Biological soup within decaying summer sea ice in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Antarctic sea ice: Biological processes, interactions and variability Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 161-171  
  Keywords (up) Marine biology; Algae; Ice composition; Pack ice; Decomposition; Ecology; Nutrient cycle; Antarctica; Amundsen Sea  
  Abstract In late February 1994, during the ANT XI/3 expedition of R/V Polarstern, ice cores from perennial sea ice were sampled in the Amundsen Sea in areas of dense pack ice. The ice was largely rotten, and a conspicuous feature was the occurrence of thick gaps and voids, often filled with a dark brown slush comprised of loose ice chunks and crystals. These interior ice assemblages were at depths between 1.0 and 1.5 m in 3 to 4 m thick ice floes, and had remarkably rich interior ice algal assemblages (<= 377 µg Chl a L?¹) which were in turn a food source for unusually large numbers of foraminifers (<= 1262 individuals L?¹), the calanoid copepod Stephos longipes (<= 163 individuals L?¹) and harpacticoid copepods (<= 168 individuals L?¹). Analysis of inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, ammonium, nitrite, and silicate) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) showed that these were sites of high nutrient supply coupled with high rates of nutrient regeneration.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Geophysical Union Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor Lizotte, M.P.; Arrigo, K.R.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Antarctic Research Series Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 73 Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-87590-901-9 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++1998 Serial 764  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Antarctic sea ice – a habitat for extremophiles Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 295 Issue 5555 Pages 641-644  
  Keywords (up) Microorganisms; Sea ice; Ecosystems; Polar zones; Antarctic zone; Epontic organisms; Sea ice ecology; Antarctic sea ice; Marine microorganisms; Marine ecosystems; Bacteria; Algae; Psychrophilic bacteria; extremophiles; Ps; Antarctica  
  Abstract The pack ice of Earth's polar oceans appears to be frozen white desert, devoid of life. However, beneath the snow lies a unique habitat for a group of bacteria and microscopic plants and animals that are encased in an ice matrix at low temperatures and light levels, with the only liquid being pockets of concentrated brines. Survival in these conditions requires a complex suite of physiological and metabolic adaptations, but sea-ice organisms thrive in the ice, and their prolific growth ensures they play a fundamental role in polar ecosystems. Apart from their ecological importance, the bacterial and algae species found in sea ice have become the focus for novel biotechnology, as well as being considered proxies for possible life forms on ice- covered extraterrestrial bodies.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Dieckmann2002_2 Serial 759  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details

Save Citations:
Export Records: