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Author Arrigo, K.R.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Large scale importance of sea ice biology in the Southern Ocean Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Antarctic Science Abbreviated Journal Antarct Sci  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) 4 Pages 471-486  
  Keywords algae; Antarctic; biogeochemistry; carbon cycle; primary production; Full Data Records  
  Abstract Despite being one of the largest biomes on earth, sea ice ecosystems have only received intensive study over the past 30 years. Sea ice is a unique habitat for assemblages of bacteria, algae, protists, and invertebrates that grow within a matrix dominated by strong gradients in temperature, salinity, nutrients, and UV and visible radiation. A suite of physiological adaptations allow these organisms to thrive in ice, where their enormous biomass makes them a fundamental component of polar ecosystems. Sea ice algae are an important energy and nutritional source for invertebrates such as juvenile krill, accounting for up to 25% of total annual primary production in ice-covered waters. The ability of ice algae to produce large amounts of UV absorbing compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids makes them even more important to organisms like krill that can incorporate these sunscreens into their own tissues. Furthermore, the nutrient and light conditions in which sea ice algae thrive induce them to synthesize enhanced concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, a vital constituent of the diet of grazing organisms, especially during winter. Finally, sea ice bacteria and algae have become the focus of biotechnology, and are being considered as proxies of possible life forms on ice-covered extraterrestrial systems. An analysis of how the balance between sea ice and pelagic production might change under a warming scenario indicates that when current levels of primary production and changes in the areas of sea ice habitats are taken into account, the expected 25% loss of sea ice over the next century would increase primary production in the Southern Ocean by approximately 10%, resulting in a slight negative feedback on climate warming.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-1020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Arrigo+Thomas2004 Serial 729  
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Author Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Thomas, D.N.; Ehn, J.; Sonninen, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Scales of horizontal patchiness in chlorophyll a, chemical and physical properties of landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume 28 Issue (up) 4 Pages 276-283  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Horizontal variation of first-year landfast sea ice properties was studied in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea. Several scales of variation were considered; a number of arrays with core spacings of 0.2, 2 and 20 m were sampled at different stages of the ice season for small-scale patchiness. Spacing between these arrays was from hundreds of meters to kilometers to study mesoscale variability, and once an onshore–offshore 40-km transect was sampled to study regional scale variability. Measured variables included salinity, stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O), chlorophyll a (chl-a), nutrients and dissolved organic carbon. On a large scale, a combination of variations in the under-ice water salinity (ice porosity), nutrient supply and the stage of ice development control the build-up of ice algal biomass. At scales of hundreds of meters to kilometers, there was significant variability in several parameters (salinity, chl-a, snow depth and ice thickness). Analyses of the data from the arrays did not show evidence of significant patchiness at scales <20 m for algal biomass. The results imply that the sampling effort in Baltic Sea ice studies should be concentrated on scales of hundreds of meters to kilometers. Using the variations observed in the study area, the estimate for depth-integrated algal biomass in landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Finland (March 2003) is 5.5±4.4 mg chl-a m-2.  
  Address Granskog: Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, P.O. Box 122, 96101 Rovaniemi, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Gulf of Finland Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2005 Serial 739  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Gleitz, M. url  openurl
  Title Allocation of photoassimilated carbon into major algal metabolite fractions: Variation between two diatom species isolated from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Polar Biology Abbreviated Journal Polar Biol  
  Volume 13 Issue (up) 4 Pages 281-286  
  Keywords carbon fixation; metabolites; biomass; Nitzschia curta; Chaetoceros; Psw; Weddell Sea  
  Abstract Distribution of photoassimilated carbon into major metabolite classes differed between two Antarctic diatom species, Nitzschia curta and a small unicellular Chaetoceros sp.. Time course uptake studies (over 54 h) revealed that¹?C allocation appeared to be equilibrated after approximately 8 h at light saturated photosynthesis. During short term dark periods (6 h), polysaccharides as well as low-molecular-weight compounds were catabolised to sustain protein synthesis in the dark, whilst lipid reserves were not mobilised for this process. Experiments with these two species were conducted at 0 and -1.5 degree C, although no difference in the distribution of radiolabel was measured between the two temperatures. It is hypothesised that under near-optimal conditions fast growing species are characterised by a high carbon turnover associated with a rapid flow of newly assimilated carbon into polymeric compound classes. On the other hand, slower growing species (such as N. curta) may store a significant amount of surplus carbon in the low-molecular-weight metabolite fraction. Species specific preferences were observed when comparing the accumulation of radiolabel into the lipid pools.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4060 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Bibliogr.: 48 ref.; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Gleitz1993 Serial 760  
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Author Carver, S.M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Thermophilic, anaerobic co-digestion of microalgal biomass and cellulose for H2 production Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biodegradation Abbreviated Journal Biodegradation  
  Volume 22 Issue (up) 4 Pages 805-814  
  Keywords Anaerobiosis; Biodegradation, Environmental; Biofuels; Biomass; Bioreactors; Cellulose/*metabolism; Chlorella vulgaris/*metabolism/microbiology; Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid; Fatty Acids, Volatile/biosynthesis; *Fermentation; *Hydrogen/metabolism; Microalgae/*metabolism/microbiology; Microbial Consortia  
  Abstract Microalgal biomass has been a focus in the sustainable energy field, especially biodiesel production. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating microalgal biomass and cellulose by anaerobic digestion for H2 production. A microbial consortium, TC60, known to degrade cellulose and other plant polymers, was enriched on a mixture of cellulose and green microalgal biomass of Dunaliella tertiolecta, a marine species, or Chlorella vulgaris, a freshwater species. After five enrichment steps at 60 degrees C, hydrogen yields increased at least 10% under all conditions. Anaerobic digestion of D. tertiolecta and cellulose by TC60 produced 7.7 mmol H2/g volatile solids (VS) which were higher than the levels (2.9-4.2 mmol/g VS) obtained with cellulose and C. vulgaris biomass. Both microalgal slurries contained satellite prokaryotes. The C. vulgaris slurry, without TC60 inoculation, generated H2 levels on par with that of TC60 on cellulose alone. The biomass-fed anaerobic digestion resulted in large shifts in short chain fatty acid concentrations and increased ammonium levels. Growth and H2 production increased when TC60 was grown on a combination of D. tertiolecta and cellulose due to nutrients released from algal cells via lysis. The results indicated that satellite heterotrophs from C. vulgaris produced H2 but the Chlorella biomass was not substantially degraded by TC60. To date, this is the first study to examine H2 production by anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass. The results indicate that H2 production is feasible but higher yields could be achieved by optimization of the bioprocess conditions including biomass pretreatment.  
  Address Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA. carver.84@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0923-9820 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20878208 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12982  
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Author Mock, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Recent advances in sea-ice microbiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ Microbiol  
  Volume 7 Issue (up) 5 Pages 605-619  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Over the past 50 years there has been much effort invested in the investigation of the ecology of sea ice. Sea ice is an ephemeral feature of the Arctic and Southern Oceans and smaller water bodies such as the Baltic and Caspian Seas. The semisolid ice matrix provides a range of habitats in which a diverse range of microbial organisms thrive. In the past 5 years there has been considerable steps forward in sea-ice research, in particular regarding the analysis of sea-ice microstructure and the investigation of the diversity and adaptation of microbial communities. These studies include: (i) controlled simulated and in situ studies on a micrometer scale to unravel the dynamic of the microhabitat with consequences for the organisms; (ii) the introduction of molecular approaches to uncover the diversity of uncultured still unknown microorganisms; and (iii) studies into the molecular adaptation of selected model organisms to the extreme environment. This minireview presents some of the most recent findings from sea-ice studies within the framework of these aims.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing, Inc. Place of Publication Oxford Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Minireview Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Mock+Thomas2005 Serial 750  
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