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Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biogenic hydrogen and methane production from Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta biomass Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biotechnology for Biofuels Abbreviated Journal Biotechnol Biofuels  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 34  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuel and bioenergy production due to their high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates and no need for external organic carbon supply. In this study, utilization of Chlorella vulgaris (a fresh water microalga) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (a marine microalga) biomass was tested as a feedstock for anaerobic H2 and CH4 production. RESULTS: Anaerobic serum bottle assays were conducted at 37 degrees C with enrichment cultures derived from municipal anaerobic digester sludge. Low levels of H2 were produced by anaerobic enrichment cultures, but H2 was subsequently consumed even in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogens. Without inoculation, algal biomass still produced H2 due to the activities of satellite bacteria associated with algal cultures. CH4 was produced from both types of biomass with anaerobic enrichments. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling indicated the presence of H2-producing and H2-consuming bacteria in the anaerobic enrichment cultures and the presence of H2-producing bacteria among the satellite bacteria in both sources of algal biomass. CONCLUSIONS: H2 production by the satellite bacteria was comparable from D. tertiolecta (12.6 ml H2/g volatile solids (VS)) and from C. vulgaris (10.8 ml H2/g VS), whereas CH4 production was significantly higher from C. vulgaris (286 ml/g VS) than from D. tertiolecta (24 ml/g VS). The high salinity of the D. tertiolecta slurry, prohibitive to methanogens, was the probable reason for lower CH4 production.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1754-6834 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21943287; PMCID:PMC3193024 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12985  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mock, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Recent advances in sea-ice microbiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ Microbiol  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages 605-619  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Over the past 50 years there has been much effort invested in the investigation of the ecology of sea ice. Sea ice is an ephemeral feature of the Arctic and Southern Oceans and smaller water bodies such as the Baltic and Caspian Seas. The semisolid ice matrix provides a range of habitats in which a diverse range of microbial organisms thrive. In the past 5 years there has been considerable steps forward in sea-ice research, in particular regarding the analysis of sea-ice microstructure and the investigation of the diversity and adaptation of microbial communities. These studies include: (i) controlled simulated and in situ studies on a micrometer scale to unravel the dynamic of the microhabitat with consequences for the organisms; (ii) the introduction of molecular approaches to uncover the diversity of uncultured still unknown microorganisms; and (iii) studies into the molecular adaptation of selected model organisms to the extreme environment. This minireview presents some of the most recent findings from sea-ice studies within the framework of these aims.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing, Inc. Place of Publication Oxford Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Minireview Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Mock+Thomas2005 Serial 750  
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Author Gomez, I.; Wiencke, C.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Variations in photosynthetic characteristics of the Antarctic marine brown alga Ascoseira mirabilis in relation to thallus age and size Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication European Journal of Phycology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Phycol  
  Volume 31 Issue 2 Pages 167-172  
  Keywords photosynthesis: thallus: carbon fixation; growth curves; algae; age; Thalli; marine flora; Ascoseira mirabilis; Antarctica  
  Abstract Growth, photosynthesis, dark respiration, chlorophyll a (Chl a) content and dry weight were measured in 2- and 3-year-old plants of Ascoseira mirabilis (Ascoseirales), cultivated in the laboratory under changing daylengths which matched the seasonal variations in the Antarctic. Determinations were made in four thallus regions. Growth of A. mirabilis was seasonal, with higher rates in spring. Parameters such as net photosynthesis (P sub(max)), photosynthetic efficiency ( alpha ), both measured on a fresh weight (FW) basis, and dry weight content, showed significant age- and size-dependent variations. In contrast, no variations were observed in dark respiration, initial light-saturating point of photosynthesis (I sub(k)) and Chl a contents. P sub(max) had maximum values close to 16.5 mu mol O sub(2)/g super(1) FW/h in 2-year-old plants, whereas in 3-year-old plants maximum values of 8 mu mol O sub(2)/g FW/h were determined. The alpha -values reached maximum rates of 1.4 and 0.6 mu mol O sub(2)/g FW/h/( mu mol photons/m super(2)/s) in 2- and 3-year-old plants, respectively. Light compensation point (I sub(c)), dry weight ratios and Chl a contents varied significantly along the length of the blade. Maximum dry:fresh weight ratios were observed in the basal region, with values close to 18%. Distal regions of the 3-year-old plants had significantly higher dry weight content than 2-year-old plants (17.5% and 13%, respectively). Chl a concentrations increased towards the middle regions of the thallus to values close to 0.35 mg Chl a/g FW. The results indicate that some morpho-functional processes in A. mirabilis, especially net photosynthesis and photosynthetic efficiency, are governed by age of the plant, thereby reflecting differences in biomass allocation and size. Our data also confirm the previously demonstrated relationship between growth and seasonal physiological activity that allows A. mirabilis to survive under the low light conditions prevailing in the Antarctic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 0967-0262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes growth curves; size; Thalli; marine flora; thallus Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gomez++1996 Serial 737  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photosynthetic microbes in freezing deserts Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Trends in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Trends Microbiol  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 87-88  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Polar deserts are not devoid of life despite the extreme low temperature and scarcity of water. Recently, patterned stone fields – caused by periglacial activity – have been surveyed in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was found that the productivity of the cyanobacteria and algae (hypoliths) that colonise the underside of the stones is strongly related to the pattern of the stones. The hypolith assemblages were in some cases as productive as lichens, bryophytes and plants that resided nearby.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 0966-842X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2005 Serial 755  
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Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in microalgal photobioreactors: a potential loss in solar energy conversion? Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 101 Issue 22 Pages 8690-8697  
  Keywords Bioreactors/*microbiology; Chlorella vulgaris/*physiology; Culture Media/chemistry; *Electric Power Supplies; Energy Transfer; Organic Chemicals/*chemistry/*metabolism; Photochemistry/*instrumentation; Solubility  
  Abstract Microalgae are considered to be a potential alternative to terrestrial crops for bio-energy production due to their relatively high productivity per unit area of land. In this work we examined the amount of dissolved organic matter exuded by algal cells cultured in photobioreactors, to examine whether a significant fraction of the photoassimilated biomass could potentially be lost from the harvestable biomass. We found that the mean maximum amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released measured 6.4% and 17.3% of the total organic carbon in cultures of Chlorellavulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, respectively. This DOM in turn supported a significant growth of bacterial biomass, representing a further loss of the algal assimilated carbon. The release of these levels of DOC indicates that a significant fraction of the photosynthetically fixed organic matter could be lost into the surrounding water, suggesting that the actual biomass yield per hectare for industrial purposes could be somewhat less than expected. A simple and inexpensive optical technique, based on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurements, to monitor such losses in commercial PBRs is discussed.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20634058 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12981  
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