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Author Raike, A.; Kortelainen, P.; Mattsson, T.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title 36 year trends in dissolved organic carbon export from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 435-436 Issue Pages 188-201  
  Keywords Baltic States; Carbon/*chemistry; Finland; Hydrology; Oceans and Seas; Rivers/*chemistry; Seasons; Soil/chemistry  
  Abstract Increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in lakes, rivers and streams in northern mid latitudes have been widely reported during the last two decades, but relatively few studies have dealt with trends in DOC export. We studied the export of DOC from Finnish rivers to the Baltic Sea between 1975 and 2010, and estimated trends in DOC fluxes (both flow normalised and non-normalised). The study encompassed the whole Finnish Baltic Sea catchment area (301,000 km(2)) covering major land use patterns in the boreal zone. Finnish rivers exported annually over 900,000 t DOC to the Baltic Sea, and the mean area specific export was 3.5 t km(-2). The highest export (7.3t km(-2)) was measured in peat dominated catchments, whereas catchments rich in lakes had the lowest export (2.2 t km(-2)). Inter-annual variation in DOC export was high and controlled mainly by hydrology. There was no overall trend in the annual water flow, although winter flow increased in northern Finland over 36 years. Despite the numerous studies showing increases in DOC concentrations in streams and rivers in the northern hemisphere, we could not find any evidence of increases in DOC export to the northern Baltic Sea from Finnish catchments since 1975.  
  Address Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), P.O. Box 140, FI-00251, Helsinki, Finland. antti.raike@ymparisto.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN (up) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22854090 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12986  
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Author Lakaniemi, A.-M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Wakeman, K.D.; Thomas, D.N.; Puhakka, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 124 Issue Pages 387-393  
  Keywords Bacteria/classification/genetics/metabolism; *Biomass; Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel; Eukaryotic Cells; Microalgae/*metabolism; Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Prokaryotic Cells  
  Abstract Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates.  
  Address Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. aino-maija.lakaniemi@tut.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN (up) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22995170 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12987  
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Author Underwood, G.J.C.; Aslam, S.N.; Michel, C.; Niemi, A.; Norman, L.; Meiners, K.M.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Paterson, H.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Broad-scale predictability of carbohydrates and exopolymers in Antarctic and Arctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 110 Issue 39 Pages 15734-15739  
  Keywords Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; Biopolymers/*analysis; Carbohydrates/*analysis; Ice Cover/*chemistry; Models, Chemical; Molecular Weight; Solubility; algae; biogeochemistry; global relationships; microbial  
  Abstract Sea ice can contain high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), much of which is carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microalgae and bacteria inhabiting the ice. Here we report the concentrations of dissolved carbohydrates (dCHO) and dissolved EPS (dEPS) in relation to algal standing stock [estimated by chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations] in sea ice from six locations in the Southern and Arctic Oceans. Concentrations varied substantially within and between sampling sites, reflecting local ice conditions and biological content. However, combining all data revealed robust statistical relationships between dCHO concentrations and the concentrations of different dEPS fractions, Chl a, and DOC. These relationships were true for whole ice cores, bottom ice (biomass rich) sections, and colder surface ice. The distribution of dEPS was strongly correlated to algal biomass, with the highest concentrations of both dEPS and non-EPS carbohydrates in the bottom horizons of the ice. Complex EPS was more prevalent in colder surface sea ice horizons. Predictive models (validated against independent data) were derived to enable the estimation of dCHO concentrations from data on ice thickness, salinity, and vertical position in core. When Chl a data were included a higher level of prediction was obtained. The consistent patterns reflected in these relationships provide a strong basis for including estimates of regional and seasonal carbohydrate and dEPS carbon budgets in coupled physical-biogeochemical models, across different types of sea ice from both polar regions.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher National Academy of Sciences Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN (up) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24019487; PMCID:PMC3785782 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 17491  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Frozen Oceans – The floating world of pack ice Type Book Whole
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Pack ice is a layer of frozen seawater on the top of the polar oceans, varying in thickness from a few centimetres to tens of metres. It is an ephemeral feature, not just of polar regions but also of seas such as the Baltic, Caspian and Sea of Okhotsk. At its maximum extent it covers 13% of the Earth's surface area, making it one of the major biomes on the planet.For many years seen as an obstacle to trade and a threat to human life, the ice itself is now perceived to be vulnerable as we come to realize the dangers posed by global warming. Sea ice not only dominates polar regions but is also central to global ocean circulation as well as global climate patterns. Every year the formation, consolidation and subsequent melt of millions of square kilometres of ice influence the whole of the ocean's ecosystems.This is the first book to offer the general reader access to a remote frozen habitat which has for so long fascinated explorers, writers and scientists. During the harsh polar winter the surface of the ocean freezes up, forming a temporary ice layer called pack ice, or sea ice. This gives rise to a spectacular floating world which for a number of months each year becomes home to a wealth of plant and animal life. The wonderful colour photographs of life on, in and under the ice help draw the reader into this superb account of an extreme environment. Guaranteed to capture the imagination.The author is a veteran of six expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and this book is packed with photographs taken in the course of his journeys. His lively and readable text conveys his excitement at the dangers and possibilities of life on the ice. He provides an in-depth background to the whole ecosystem of sea ice, its living communities and the structure of the ice itself. The level of accurate scientific detail will satisfy anyone looking for a reliable, up-to-date overview of this topic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Natural History Museum Place of Publication London Editor Coyne, C.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN (up) 0-565-09188-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2004 Serial 756  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. (eds) url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sea ice – an introduction to its physics, chemistry, biology and geology Type Book Whole
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 402 pp  
  Keywords Sea Ice  
  Abstract Sea ice, which covers up to 7% of the planet's surface, is a major component of the world's oceans, partly driving ocean circulation and global climate patterns. It provides a habitat for a rich diversity of marine organisms, and is a valuable source of information in studies of global climate change and the evolution of present day life forms. Increasingly, sea ice is being used as a proxy for extraterrestrial ice covered systems.

Sea Ice provides a comprehensive review of our current available knowledge of polar pack ice, the study of which is severely constrained by the logistic difficulties of working in such harsh and remote regions of the earth. The book's editors, Drs Thomas and Dieckmann have drawn together an impressive group of international contributing authors, providing a well-edited and integrated volume, which will stand for many years as the standard work on the subject. Contents of the book include details of the growth, microstructure and properties of sea ice, large-scale variations in thickness and characteristics, its primary production, micro-and macrobiology, sea ice as a habitat for birds and mammals, sea ice biogeochemistry, particulate flux, and the distribution and significance of palaeo sea ice.
 
  Address Thomas: School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, UK; Dieckmann: Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Oxford Editor Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN (up) 0-632-05808-0 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 40 Illustrations Approved yes  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ library-34/436/1 Serial 7  
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