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Author Kennedy, H.; Thomas, D.N.; Kattner, G.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Particulate organic matter in Antarctic summer sea ice: concentration and stable isotopic composition Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol Prog Ser  
  Volume 238 Issue Pages (down) 1-13  
  Keywords Pom; Anarctic sea ice; ice microalgae; carbon isotopic composition  
  Abstract The chemical and isotopic data from sea ice collected over a wide area of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the austral summer/early autumn illustrate the range of environmental conditions under which ice algae grow. A range of ice types and features were sampled including intact and layered ice floes and surface ponds. Sea ice communities were found in all these environments but the highest biomasses were found either at the base of ice floes, or in the interior of layered floes with quasi-continuous horizontal gaps at or shortly below the water level. In the layered floes, particulate organic carbon (POC) measured in the ice layer immediately overlying the gap water (280 to 6014 µmol dm?³) was in excess of what would be predicted if algal growth had occurred in a closed environment. The chemical composition of the gap water was strongly affected by biological activity in the overlying ice, which acts as a physical support for the algae retained within its matrix. The lowest range of POC (27 to 739 µmol dm?³) conformed to predictions of algal growth in a closed system and samples were collected from the interior of ice floes where there was essentially no potential for nutrient exchange. The surface ponds displayed nitrate (NO³?) exhaustion and total dissolved inorganic carbon (?CO?) reductions consistent with nutrient limited algal growth. The stable carbon isotopic composition of the particulate organic matter (POM) across all habitat types sampled (?¹³CPOC -10.0 to -27.3?) displayed a wide range but was much less variable than the range of POC concentrations might have implied. The assumption that the highest biomass of algae in sea ice will result in the most positive ?¹³CPOC values cannot be generally applied. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (?¹³C?CO?) in gap waters and surface ponds varied from 0.15 to 3.0? and was shown to be commensurate with the changes predicted from NO³? deficits caused by algal growth.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Inter-Research Place of Publication Oldendorf/Luhe Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Kennedy++2002 Serial 746  
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Author Thomas, D.N. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Frozen Oceans – The floating world of pack ice Type Book Whole
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Pack ice is a layer of frozen seawater on the top of the polar oceans, varying in thickness from a few centimetres to tens of metres. It is an ephemeral feature, not just of polar regions but also of seas such as the Baltic, Caspian and Sea of Okhotsk. At its maximum extent it covers 13% of the Earth's surface area, making it one of the major biomes on the planet.For many years seen as an obstacle to trade and a threat to human life, the ice itself is now perceived to be vulnerable as we come to realize the dangers posed by global warming. Sea ice not only dominates polar regions but is also central to global ocean circulation as well as global climate patterns. Every year the formation, consolidation and subsequent melt of millions of square kilometres of ice influence the whole of the ocean's ecosystems.This is the first book to offer the general reader access to a remote frozen habitat which has for so long fascinated explorers, writers and scientists. During the harsh polar winter the surface of the ocean freezes up, forming a temporary ice layer called pack ice, or sea ice. This gives rise to a spectacular floating world which for a number of months each year becomes home to a wealth of plant and animal life. The wonderful colour photographs of life on, in and under the ice help draw the reader into this superb account of an extreme environment. Guaranteed to capture the imagination.The author is a veteran of six expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and this book is packed with photographs taken in the course of his journeys. His lively and readable text conveys his excitement at the dangers and possibilities of life on the ice. He provides an in-depth background to the whole ecosystem of sea ice, its living communities and the structure of the ice itself. The level of accurate scientific detail will satisfy anyone looking for a reliable, up-to-date overview of this topic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Natural History Museum Place of Publication London Editor Coyne, C.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-565-09188-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2004 Serial 756  
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Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. (eds) url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sea ice – an introduction to its physics, chemistry, biology and geology Type Book Whole
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords zoology; sea ice  
  Abstract Sea ice, which covers up to 7% of the planets surface, is a major component of the worlds oceans, partly driving ocean circulation and global climate patterns...  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Oxford Editor Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-632-05808-0 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Thomas+Dieckmann2003 Serial 845  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. (eds) url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sea ice – an introduction to its physics, chemistry, biology and geology Type Book Whole
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords zoology; sea ice  
  Abstract Sea ice, which covers up to 7% of the planets surface, is a major component of the worlds oceans, partly driving ocean circulation and global climate patterns...  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Oxford Editor Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-632-05808-0 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Thomas+Dieckmann2003 Serial 849  
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Author Krell, A.; Ummenhofer, C.; Kattner, G.; Naumov, A.; Evans, D.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Thomas, D.N. openurl 
  Title The biology and chemistry of land fast ice in the White Sea, Russia – A comparison of winter and spring conditions Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Various abiotic and biotic parameters, including phytoplankton distribution, were studied to investigate seasonal changes within the fast-ice cover in Chupa Inlet, a freshwater-influenced Arctic-like fjord in Kandalaksha Bay (White Sea). Sea ice and under-ice water were collected along transects in the inlet in February and April 2002. Ice-texture analysis, salinity and δ18O values indicated that the complete ice sheet had transformed within 2 months. This resulted from an upward growth of snow ice and subsequent melting at the underside of the ice, which makes a comparison between the two sampling periods difficult in terms of defining temporal developments within the ice. Nutrients, DOC and DON concentrations in the under-ice water were typical for Russian Arctic rivers. Concentrations of nitrate, silicate and DOC in the ice were lower, which is attributed to a loss as the ice forms. The concentrations were also modified by biological activity. In February, there was a strong correspondence between the distribution of biological parameters, including particulate and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON, DOC and DON) and inorganic nutrients (nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate), which was not the case in April. The correlation between both DOC and DON with ammonium indicates heterotrophic activity within the winter ice collected in February. Sea-ice organisms were distributed throughout the ice, and several assemblages were found in surface layers of the ice. In April, a more typical distribution of biomass in the ice was measured, with low values in the upper part and high algal concentrations in the lower sections of the ice, characteristic of a spring ice-algal bloom. In contrast to the February sampling, there was evidence that the ice-algal assemblage in April was nitrogen-limited, with total inorganic nitrogen concentrations being  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Krell++2003 Serial 15285  
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