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Author Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photosynthetic microbes in freezing deserts Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Trends in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Trends Microbiol  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages (down) 87-88  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Polar deserts are not devoid of life despite the extreme low temperature and scarcity of water. Recently, patterned stone fields – caused by periglacial activity – have been surveyed in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was found that the productivity of the cyanobacteria and algae (hypoliths) that colonise the underside of the stones is strongly related to the pattern of the stones. The hypolith assemblages were in some cases as productive as lichens, bryophytes and plants that resided nearby.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0966-842X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2005 Serial 755  
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Author Dieckmann, G.S.; Eicken, H.; Haas, C.; Garrison, D.L.; Gleitz, M.; Lange, M.; Nöthig, E.-M.; Spindler, M.; Sullivan, C.W.; Thomas, D.N.; Weissenberger, J. isbn  openurl
  Title A compilation of data on sea ice algal standing crop from the Bellingshausen, Amundsen and Weddell Seas from 1983 to 1994 Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Antarctic sea ice: Biological processes, interactions and variability Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down) 85-92  
  Keywords Algae; Biomass; Ecology; Ice composition; Antarctica; Bellingshausen Sea; Amundsen Sea; Weddell Sea  
  Abstract Algal standing stock as chlorophyll a in sea ice was compiled from 448 cores collected during 13 U.S. and German research cruises to Antarctica between 1983 and 1994. The data have a high variability and show no clear relationships with other parameters such as core length. However, seasonal variations in standing stock are discernable. The authors recommend that due to the high variability in the data and inconsistency of sampling methods, the data be used with caution, since they do not represent all sea ice habitats. We provide the data due to the current need for such information for the parameterization of models.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Geophysical Union Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor Lizotte, M.P.; Arrigo, K.R.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Antarctic Research Series Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 73 Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-87590-901-9 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Dieckmann++1998 Serial 731  
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Author Gleitz, M.; Rutgers v d Loeff, M.; Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S.; Millero, F.J. url  openurl
  Title Comparison of summer and winter inorganic carbon, oxygen and nutrient concentrations in Antarctic sea ice brine Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Marine Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Mar Chem  
  Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages (down) 81-91  
  Keywords dissolved oxygen; inorganic compounds; summer; winter; nutrients (mineral); Antarctic zone; sea ice; brines; carbon; chemical composition; Psw; Weddell Sea; polar zones; polar regions; nutrients  
  Abstract During summer (January 1991) and winter (April 1992) cruises to the southern Weddell Sea (Antarctica), brine samples were collected from first year sea ice and analysed for salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and major nutrient concentrations. Additionally, the carbonate system was determined from measurements of pH and total alkalinity. During winter, brine chemical composition was largely determined by seawater concentration in the course of freezing. Brine temperatures ranged from -1.9 to -6.7 °C. Precipitation of calcium carbonate was not observed at the corresponding salinity range of 34 to 108. Removal of carbon from the total inorganic carbon pool (up to 500 µmol Ct kg?¹) was related to reduced nutrient concentrations, indicating the presence of photosynthetically active ice algal assemblages in the winter sea ice. However, nutrient and inorganic carbon concentrations did generally not reach growth limiting levels for phytoplankton. The combined effect of photosynthesis and physical concentration resulted in O? concentrations of up to 650 µmol kg?¹. During summer, brine salinities ranged from 21 to 41 with most values >28, showing that the net effect of freezing and melting on brine chemical composition was generally slight. Opposite to the winter situation, brine chemical composition was strongly influenced by biological activity. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation resulted in a Ct depletion of up to 1200 µmol kg?¹, which was associated with CO? (aq) exhaustion and O? concentrations as high as 933 µmol kg?¹. The concurrent depletion of major nutrients generally corresponded to uptake ratios predicted from phytoplankton biochemical composition. Primary productivity in summer sea ice is apparently sustained until inorganic resources are fully exhausted, resulting in brine chemical compositions that differ profoundly from those of surface waters. This may have important implications for pathways of ice algal carbon acquisition, carbon isotope fractionation as well as for species distribution in the open water phytoplankton.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science B.V. Place of Publication Amsterdam Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Gleitz++1995 Serial 733  
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Author Steffens, M.; Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Luodekari, K.; Papadimitriou, S.; Thomas, D.N. url  openurl
  Title Spatial variation of biogeochemical properties of landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea Type Conference Article
  Year 2006 Publication Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal Ann Glaciol  
  Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages (down) 80-87  
  Keywords Sea ice; Fast ice; Sea ice properties; Ice algae; Chlorophyll; Biogeochemistry; Nutrients (mineral); Particulate organic matter; Dissolved organic matter; Salinity; Spatial scale; Spatial variability; Horizontal patchiness; Sampling design; Brackish water; Ane; Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia  
  Abstract Horizontal variation of landfast sea-ice properties was studied in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea, during March 2004. In order to estimate their variability among and within different spatial levels, 72 ice cores were sampled on five spatial scales (with spacings of 10 cm, 2.5 m, 25 m, 250 m and 2.5 km) using a hierarchical sampling design. Entire cores were melted, and bulk-ice salinity, concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), phaeophytin (Phaeo), dissolved nitrate plus nitrite (DIN) as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were determined. All sampling sites were covered by a 5.5-23 cm thick layer of snow. Ice thicknesses of cores varied from 26 to 58 cm, with bulk-ice salinities ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 as is typical for Baltic Sea ice. Observed values for Chl a (range: 0.8-6.0 μg Chl a l-1; median: 2.9 μg Chl a l -1) and DOC (range: 37-397 μM; median: 95 μM) were comparable to values reported by previous sea-ice studies from the Baltic Sea. Analysis of variance among different spatial levels revealed significant differences on the 2.5 km scale for ice thickness, DOC and Phaeo (with the latter two being positively correlated with ice thickness). For salinity and Chl a, the 250 m scale was found to be the largest scale where significant differences could be detected, while snow depth only varied significantly on the 25 m scale. Variability on the 2.5 m scale contributed significantly to the total variation for ice thickness, salinity, Chl a and DIN. In the case of DON, none of the investigated levels exhibited variation that was significantly different from the considerable amount of variation found between replicate cores. Results from a principal component analysis suggest that ice thickness is one of the main elements structuring the investigated ice habitat on a large scale, while snow depth, nutrients and salinity seem to be of secondary importance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0260-3055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Gulf of Bothnia Expedition Conference International Symposium on Sea Ice, Dunedin (New Zealand), 5-9 Dec 2005  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Steffens++2006 Serial 754  
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Author Steffens, M.; Granskog, M.A.; Kaartokallio, H.; Kuosa, H.; Luodekari, K.; Papadimitriou, S.; Thomas, D.N. openurl 
  Title Spatial variation of biogeochemical properties of landfast sea ice in the Gulf of Bothnia, Baltic Sea Type Conference Article
  Year 2006 Publication Proceedings of the International Symposium on Sea Ice, Dunedin (New Zealand), 5-9 Dec 2005 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down) 80-87  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 44 Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Steffens2006 Serial 17385  
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