toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
  Records Links
Author Thomas, D.N. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Frozen Oceans – The floating world of pack ice Type Book Whole
  Year 2004 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Pack ice is a layer of frozen seawater on the top of the polar oceans, varying in thickness from a few centimetres to tens of metres. It is an ephemeral feature, not just of polar regions but also of seas such as the Baltic, Caspian and Sea of Okhotsk. At its maximum extent it covers 13% of the Earth's surface area, making it one of the major biomes on the planet.For many years seen as an obstacle to trade and a threat to human life, the ice itself is now perceived to be vulnerable as we come to realize the dangers posed by global warming. Sea ice not only dominates polar regions but is also central to global ocean circulation as well as global climate patterns. Every year the formation, consolidation and subsequent melt of millions of square kilometres of ice influence the whole of the ocean's ecosystems.This is the first book to offer the general reader access to a remote frozen habitat which has for so long fascinated explorers, writers and scientists. During the harsh polar winter the surface of the ocean freezes up, forming a temporary ice layer called pack ice, or sea ice. This gives rise to a spectacular floating world which for a number of months each year becomes home to a wealth of plant and animal life. The wonderful colour photographs of life on, in and under the ice help draw the reader into this superb account of an extreme environment. Guaranteed to capture the imagination.The author is a veteran of six expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and this book is packed with photographs taken in the course of his journeys. His lively and readable text conveys his excitement at the dangers and possibilities of life on the ice. He provides an in-depth background to the whole ecosystem of sea ice, its living communities and the structure of the ice itself. The level of accurate scientific detail will satisfy anyone looking for a reliable, up-to-date overview of this topic.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Natural History Museum Place of Publication London Editor (up) Coyne, C.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-565-09188-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas2004 Serial 756  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Dieckmann, G.S. openurl 
  Title Biogeochemistry of Antarctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review Abbreviated Journal Oceanogr Mar Biol Annu Rev  
  Volume 40 Issue Pages 143-169  
  Keywords Sea ice; Biogeochemistry; Nutrients (mineral); Dissolved gases; Dissolved organic matter; Ps; Antarctic Ocean  
  Abstract Antarctic sea ice at its maximum extent in winter covers 40% of the Southern Ocean in a frozen layer, on average, 1 m thick. Sea ice is not solid, rather it is an ice crystal matrix permeated by a labyrinth of brine filled channels and pores in which life thrives. Organisms are constrained by a set of physicochemical factors quite unlike anything they encounter in the plankton from where they are recruited. Because sea ice is increasingly viewed as a suitable proxy for life in previous periods of the Earth's history, and even for astrobiology, it is pertinent that the physicochemical constraints acting upon sea-ice biology are better understood. The, largely microbial, network that develops in the ice itself imparts a unique chemistry that influences the nature and chemical composition of biogenic material released from the ice. This chemistry can result in the export of material to the sediments with distinctive chemical signatures that are useful tools for reconstructing past sea-ice cover of the oceans. This review synthesises information on inorganic nutrient, dissolved organic matter and dissolved gases from a variety of Antarctic ice habitats.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication London Editor (up) Gibson, R.N.; Barnes, M.; Atkinson, R.J.A.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0415254620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Review; Marine Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Dieckmann2002 Serial 758  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Giannelli, V.; Thomas, D.N.; Haas, C.; Kattner, G.; Kennedy, H.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Behaviour of dissolved organic matter and inorganic nutrients during experimental sea-ice formation Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal Ann Glaciol  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 317-321  
  Keywords  
  Abstract It is well established that during sea-ice formation, crystals aggregate into a solid matrix, and dissolved sea-water constituents, including inorganic nutrients, are rejected from the ice matrix. However, the behaviour of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during ice formation and growth has not been studied to date. DOM is the primary energetic substrate for microbial heterotrophic activity in sea water and sea ice, and therefore it is at the base of the trophic fluxes within the microbial food web. The aim of our study was to compare the behaviour of DOM and inorganic nutrients during formation and growth of sea ice. Experiments were conducted in a large indoor ice-tank facility (Hamburg Ship Model Basin, Germany) at -15°C. Three 1 m³ tanks, to which synthetic sea water, nutrients and dissolved organic compounds (diatom-extracted DOM) had been added, were sampled over a period of 5 days during sea-ice formation. Samples were collected throughout the experiment from water underlying the ice, and at the end from the ice as well. Brine was obtained from the ice by centrifuging ice cores. Inorganic nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) were substantially enriched in brine in comparison to water and ice phases, consistent with the processes of ice formation and brine rejection. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was also enriched in brine but was more variable and enriched in comparison to a dilution line. No difference in bacteria numbers was observed between water, ice and brine. No bacteria growth was measured, and this therefore had no influence on the measurable DOC levels. We conclude that the incorporation of dissolved organic compounds in newly forming ice is conservative. However, since the proportions of DOC in the brine were partially higher than those of the inorganic nutrients, concentrating effects of DOC in brine might be different compared to salts.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor (up) Intl. Symp. on Sea Ice and its Interaction with the Ocean, A. and B., Fairbanks, Alaska(USA), 19-23 Jun 2000,  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0260-3055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Conference Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Giannelli++2001 Serial 732  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomas, D.N.; Kattner, G.; Engbrodt, R.; Giannelli, V.; Kennedy, H.; Haas, C.; Dieckmann, G.S. url  openurl
  Title Dissolved organic matter in Antarctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Annals of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal Ann Glaciol  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 297-303  
  Keywords  
  Abstract It has been hypothesized that there are significant dissolved organic matter (DOM) pools in sea-ice systems, although measurements of DOM in sea ice have only rarely been made. The significance of DOM for ice-based productivity and carbon turnover therefore remains highly speculative. DOM within sea ice from the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, Antarctica, in 1994 and the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, in 1992 and 1997 was investigated. Measurements were made on melted sea-ice sections in 1994 and 1997 and in sea-ice brines in 1992. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations in melted ice cores were up to 1.8 and 0.78 mM, respectively, or 30 and 8 times higher than those in surface water concentrations, respectively. However, when concentrations within the brine channel/pore space were calculated from estimated brine volumes, actual concentrations of DOC in brines were up to 23.3 mM and DON up to 2.2 mM, although mean values were 1.8 and 0.15 mM, respectively. There were higher concentrations of DOM in warm, porous summer second-year sea ice compared with colder autumn first-year ice, consistent with the different biological activity supported within the various ice types. However, in general there was poor correlation between DOC and DON with algal biomass and numbers of bacteria within the ice. The mean DOC/DON ratio was 11, although again values were highly variable, ranging from 3 to highly carbon-enriched samples of 95. Measurements made on a limited dataset showed that carbohydrates constitute on average 35% of the DOC pool, with highly variable contributions of 1–99%.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor (up) Intl. Symp. on Sea Ice and its Interaction with the Ocean, A. and B., Fairbanks, Alaska(USA), 19-23 Jun 2000,  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0260-3055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Conference Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas++2001 Serial 761  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dieckmann, G.S.; Eicken, H.; Haas, C.; Garrison, D.L.; Gleitz, M.; Lange, M.; Nöthig, E.-M.; Spindler, M.; Sullivan, C.W.; Thomas, D.N.; Weissenberger, J. isbn  openurl
  Title A compilation of data on sea ice algal standing crop from the Bellingshausen, Amundsen and Weddell Seas from 1983 to 1994 Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Antarctic sea ice: Biological processes, interactions and variability Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 85-92  
  Keywords Algae; Biomass; Ecology; Ice composition; Antarctica; Bellingshausen Sea; Amundsen Sea; Weddell Sea  
  Abstract Algal standing stock as chlorophyll a in sea ice was compiled from 448 cores collected during 13 U.S. and German research cruises to Antarctica between 1983 and 1994. The data have a high variability and show no clear relationships with other parameters such as core length. However, seasonal variations in standing stock are discernable. The authors recommend that due to the high variability in the data and inconsistency of sampling methods, the data be used with caution, since they do not represent all sea ice habitats. We provide the data due to the current need for such information for the parameterization of models.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Geophysical Union Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor (up) Lizotte, M.P.; Arrigo, K.R.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Antarctic Research Series Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 73 Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-87590-901-9 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Dieckmann++1998 Serial 731  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details

Save Citations:
Export Records: