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Author Granskog, M.A.; Virkkunen, K.; Thomas, D.N.; Ehn, J.; Kola, H.; Martma, T. url  openurl
  Title Chemical properties of brackish water ice in the Bothnian Bay, the Baltic Sea Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Glaciology Abbreviated Journal J Glaciol  
  Volume 50 Issue 169 Pages 292-302  
  Keywords Dependent Solute Redistribution; Dissolved Organic Matter; Phase Boundary; Sulfate; Binding; Summer; Oxygen; Core; Gulf  
  Abstract The behavior of majors, δ18O, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trace elements was studied during the initial freezing of low-saline water (3 practical salinity units) in a freezing experiment. Samples were also collected from first-year sea ice from pack ice in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. During initial ice formation, the major-ion ratios in sea ice indicated variable behavior, with some ions showing relative enrichment (sulfate, calcium and magnesium), conservative behavior (sodium) or relative depletion (potassium) compared to sea water at the same salinity DOC, iron and aluminum showed enrichment in the ice, while zinc was depleted to salinity. Lead was detected in surface snow-ice layers only, implying atmospheric accumulation. First-year sea ice, with a variable growth and thermal history, showed behavior for major ions similar to that observed in new ice. However, for trace elements the picture was much more complicated, most likely due to active secondary processes such as atmospheric supply and biological activity. Ice growth has a potential impact on the chemical budgets and cycling of some elements, especially those which are selectively rejected/retained during sea-ice formation, particularly in the shallow parts of the Bothnian Bay covered with a land-fast ice cover.  
  Address (up) Granskog: Univ Helsinki, Dept Phys Sci, Div Geophys, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Glaciological Society Place of Publication Cambridge Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Baltic Sea; Bothnian Bay Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000227720900014 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Granskog++2004 Serial 741  
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Author Underwood, G.J.C.; Aslam, S.N.; Michel, C.; Niemi, A.; Norman, L.; Meiners, K.M.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Paterson, H.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Broad-scale predictability of carbohydrates and exopolymers in Antarctic and Arctic sea ice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 110 Issue 39 Pages 15734-15739  
  Keywords Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; Biopolymers/*analysis; Carbohydrates/*analysis; Ice Cover/*chemistry; Models, Chemical; Molecular Weight; Solubility; algae; biogeochemistry; global relationships; microbial  
  Abstract Sea ice can contain high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), much of which is carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microalgae and bacteria inhabiting the ice. Here we report the concentrations of dissolved carbohydrates (dCHO) and dissolved EPS (dEPS) in relation to algal standing stock [estimated by chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations] in sea ice from six locations in the Southern and Arctic Oceans. Concentrations varied substantially within and between sampling sites, reflecting local ice conditions and biological content. However, combining all data revealed robust statistical relationships between dCHO concentrations and the concentrations of different dEPS fractions, Chl a, and DOC. These relationships were true for whole ice cores, bottom ice (biomass rich) sections, and colder surface ice. The distribution of dEPS was strongly correlated to algal biomass, with the highest concentrations of both dEPS and non-EPS carbohydrates in the bottom horizons of the ice. Complex EPS was more prevalent in colder surface sea ice horizons. Predictive models (validated against independent data) were derived to enable the estimation of dCHO concentrations from data on ice thickness, salinity, and vertical position in core. When Chl a data were included a higher level of prediction was obtained. The consistent patterns reflected in these relationships provide a strong basis for including estimates of regional and seasonal carbohydrate and dEPS carbon budgets in coupled physical-biogeochemical models, across different types of sea ice from both polar regions.  
  Address (up) School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher National Academy of Sciences Place of Publication Washington, DC Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24019487; PMCID:PMC3785782 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 17491  
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Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Energy efficiency of an outdoor microalgal photobioreactor sited at mid-temperate latitude Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 12 Pages 6687-6695  
  Keywords Biomass; *Bioreactors; Climate; Geography; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Oxygen/metabolism; Scenedesmus/growth & development/*metabolism; Seasons; Solar Energy  
  Abstract This work examined the energetic performance of a 6-month semi-continuous cultivation of Scenedesmus obliquus in an outdoor photobioreactor at mid-temperate latitude, without temperature control. By measuring the seasonal biomass production (mean 11.31, range 1.39-23.67 g m(-2)d(-1)), higher heating value (22.94 kJ g(-1)) and solar irradiance, the mean seasonally-averaged photosynthetic efficiency (2.18%) and gross energy productivity (0.27 MJ m(-2) d(-1)) was calculated. When comparing the solar energy conversion efficiency to the energy investment for culture circulation, significant improvements in reactor energy input must be made to make the system viable. Using the data collected to model the energetic performance of a substitute photobioreactor design, we conclude that sustainable photobioreactor cultivation of microalgae in similar temperate climates requires a short light path and low power input, only reasonably obtained by flat-panel systems. However, temperature control was not necessary for effective long-term cultivation.  
  Address (up) School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21511466 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12984  
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Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Productivity, carbon dioxide uptake and net energy return of microalgal bubble column photobioreactors Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 10 Pages 5775-5787  
  Keywords *Bioreactors; Carbon Dioxide/*metabolism; Energy Metabolism; Equipment Design; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Photochemistry  
  Abstract This work examined the energy return of Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivated in a gas-sparged photobioreactor design where the power input for sparging was manipulated (10, 20, and 50 Wm(-3)). Dry weight, organic carbon and heating values of the biomass were measured, plus a suite of variables including Fv/Fm and dissolved oxygen. A model for predicting the higher heating value of microalgal biomass was developed and used to measure the energetic performance of batch cultivations. High power inputs enhanced maximum biomass yields, but did not improve the energy return. Cultivation in 10 Wm(-3) showed up to a 39% higher cumulative net energy return than 50 Wm(-3), and increased the cumulative net energy ratio up to fourfold. The highest net energy ratio for power input was 19.3 (D. tertiolecta, 12% CO(2), 10 Wm(-3)). These systems may be a sustainable method of biomass production, but their effectiveness is sensitive to operational parameters.  
  Address (up) School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Isle of Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21376576 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12983  
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Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in microalgal photobioreactors: a potential loss in solar energy conversion? Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 101 Issue 22 Pages 8690-8697  
  Keywords Bioreactors/*microbiology; Chlorella vulgaris/*physiology; Culture Media/chemistry; *Electric Power Supplies; Energy Transfer; Organic Chemicals/*chemistry/*metabolism; Photochemistry/*instrumentation; Solubility  
  Abstract Microalgae are considered to be a potential alternative to terrestrial crops for bio-energy production due to their relatively high productivity per unit area of land. In this work we examined the amount of dissolved organic matter exuded by algal cells cultured in photobioreactors, to examine whether a significant fraction of the photoassimilated biomass could potentially be lost from the harvestable biomass. We found that the mean maximum amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released measured 6.4% and 17.3% of the total organic carbon in cultures of Chlorellavulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, respectively. This DOM in turn supported a significant growth of bacterial biomass, representing a further loss of the algal assimilated carbon. The release of these levels of DOC indicates that a significant fraction of the photosynthetically fixed organic matter could be lost into the surrounding water, suggesting that the actual biomass yield per hectare for industrial purposes could be somewhat less than expected. A simple and inexpensive optical technique, based on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurements, to monitor such losses in commercial PBRs is discussed.  
  Address (up) School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20634058 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12981  
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