toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
  Records Links
Author Thomas, D.N.; Mock, T. url  openurl
  Title Life in frozen veins – coping with the cold Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication The Biochemist Abbreviated Journal (up) Biochemist  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 12-16  
  Keywords adaptation; Antarctic; Arctic; low temperature; micro-organism; sea ice  
  Abstract Every autumn a fundamental transition occurs in the surface waters of Polar Oceans. The surface waters of millions of square kilometres freeze to form an ice layer that varies from a few centimetres through to several metres thick, and which effectively separates the ocean from the atmosphere above. Ice made from seawater is a porous, semi-solid matrix permeated by a labyrinth of brine channels and pores, and within these a diverse microbial assemblage, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, flagellates and unicellular algae can thrive. These assemblages can reach such high abundances that the ice becomes a rich coffee colour. The microbial assemblages are in turn a rich food source for grazing proto- and zooplankton, especially in winter when food in the water column is scarce.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Biochemical Society Place of Publication London Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ admin @ Thomas+Mock2005 Serial 765  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Carver, S.M.; Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N.; Tuovinen, O.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Thermophilic, anaerobic co-digestion of microalgal biomass and cellulose for H2 production Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biodegradation Abbreviated Journal (up) Biodegradation  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 805-814  
  Keywords Anaerobiosis; Biodegradation, Environmental; Biofuels; Biomass; Bioreactors; Cellulose/*metabolism; Chlorella vulgaris/*metabolism/microbiology; Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid; Fatty Acids, Volatile/biosynthesis; *Fermentation; *Hydrogen/metabolism; Microalgae/*metabolism/microbiology; Microbial Consortia  
  Abstract Microalgal biomass has been a focus in the sustainable energy field, especially biodiesel production. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating microalgal biomass and cellulose by anaerobic digestion for H2 production. A microbial consortium, TC60, known to degrade cellulose and other plant polymers, was enriched on a mixture of cellulose and green microalgal biomass of Dunaliella tertiolecta, a marine species, or Chlorella vulgaris, a freshwater species. After five enrichment steps at 60 degrees C, hydrogen yields increased at least 10% under all conditions. Anaerobic digestion of D. tertiolecta and cellulose by TC60 produced 7.7 mmol H2/g volatile solids (VS) which were higher than the levels (2.9-4.2 mmol/g VS) obtained with cellulose and C. vulgaris biomass. Both microalgal slurries contained satellite prokaryotes. The C. vulgaris slurry, without TC60 inoculation, generated H2 levels on par with that of TC60 on cellulose alone. The biomass-fed anaerobic digestion resulted in large shifts in short chain fatty acid concentrations and increased ammonium levels. Growth and H2 production increased when TC60 was grown on a combination of D. tertiolecta and cellulose due to nutrients released from algal cells via lysis. The results indicated that satellite heterotrophs from C. vulgaris produced H2 but the Chlorella biomass was not substantially degraded by TC60. To date, this is the first study to examine H2 production by anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass. The results indicate that H2 production is feasible but higher yields could be achieved by optimization of the bioprocess conditions including biomass pretreatment.  
  Address Department of Microbiology, Ohio State University, 484 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA. carver.84@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0923-9820 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20878208 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12982  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in microalgal photobioreactors: a potential loss in solar energy conversion? Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 101 Issue 22 Pages 8690-8697  
  Keywords Bioreactors/*microbiology; Chlorella vulgaris/*physiology; Culture Media/chemistry; *Electric Power Supplies; Energy Transfer; Organic Chemicals/*chemistry/*metabolism; Photochemistry/*instrumentation; Solubility  
  Abstract Microalgae are considered to be a potential alternative to terrestrial crops for bio-energy production due to their relatively high productivity per unit area of land. In this work we examined the amount of dissolved organic matter exuded by algal cells cultured in photobioreactors, to examine whether a significant fraction of the photoassimilated biomass could potentially be lost from the harvestable biomass. We found that the mean maximum amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released measured 6.4% and 17.3% of the total organic carbon in cultures of Chlorellavulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, respectively. This DOM in turn supported a significant growth of bacterial biomass, representing a further loss of the algal assimilated carbon. The release of these levels of DOC indicates that a significant fraction of the photosynthetically fixed organic matter could be lost into the surrounding water, suggesting that the actual biomass yield per hectare for industrial purposes could be somewhat less than expected. A simple and inexpensive optical technique, based on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurements, to monitor such losses in commercial PBRs is discussed.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20634058 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12981  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Productivity, carbon dioxide uptake and net energy return of microalgal bubble column photobioreactors Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 10 Pages 5775-5787  
  Keywords *Bioreactors; Carbon Dioxide/*metabolism; Energy Metabolism; Equipment Design; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Photochemistry  
  Abstract This work examined the energy return of Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivated in a gas-sparged photobioreactor design where the power input for sparging was manipulated (10, 20, and 50 Wm(-3)). Dry weight, organic carbon and heating values of the biomass were measured, plus a suite of variables including Fv/Fm and dissolved oxygen. A model for predicting the higher heating value of microalgal biomass was developed and used to measure the energetic performance of batch cultivations. High power inputs enhanced maximum biomass yields, but did not improve the energy return. Cultivation in 10 Wm(-3) showed up to a 39% higher cumulative net energy return than 50 Wm(-3), and increased the cumulative net energy ratio up to fourfold. The highest net energy ratio for power input was 19.3 (D. tertiolecta, 12% CO(2), 10 Wm(-3)). These systems may be a sustainable method of biomass production, but their effectiveness is sensitive to operational parameters.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Isle of Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21376576 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12983  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hulatt, C.J.; Thomas, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Energy efficiency of an outdoor microalgal photobioreactor sited at mid-temperate latitude Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Bioresource Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Bioresour Technol  
  Volume 102 Issue 12 Pages 6687-6695  
  Keywords Biomass; *Bioreactors; Climate; Geography; Microalgae/growth & development/*metabolism; Oxygen/metabolism; Scenedesmus/growth & development/*metabolism; Seasons; Solar Energy  
  Abstract This work examined the energetic performance of a 6-month semi-continuous cultivation of Scenedesmus obliquus in an outdoor photobioreactor at mid-temperate latitude, without temperature control. By measuring the seasonal biomass production (mean 11.31, range 1.39-23.67 g m(-2)d(-1)), higher heating value (22.94 kJ g(-1)) and solar irradiance, the mean seasonally-averaged photosynthetic efficiency (2.18%) and gross energy productivity (0.27 MJ m(-2) d(-1)) was calculated. When comparing the solar energy conversion efficiency to the energy investment for culture circulation, significant improvements in reactor energy input must be made to make the system viable. Using the data collected to model the energetic performance of a substitute photobioreactor design, we conclude that sustainable photobioreactor cultivation of microalgae in similar temperate climates requires a short light path and low power input, only reasonably obtained by flat-panel systems. However, temperature control was not necessary for effective long-term cultivation.  
  Address School of Ocean Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Askew Street, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK. osp418@bangor.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-8524 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21511466 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 12984  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details

Save Citations:
Export Records: